Posts tagged ‘parenting’

Fit for a Prince

 Carlo the Mouse, Book 4: Rules Are for a Reason
Written by Mrs. D
Illustrated by Chanoa

Book 4 continues the adventures of Carlo, the intrepid mouse, on his adventure in the hospital where he lives. Carlo spends most of his time dodging the hospital administrator who is determined to eliminate him. When Carlo spies a poster on the wall labeled “most wanted mouse,” he becomes indignant because he feels it doesn’t do him justice.

Carlo’s parents have repeatedly warned him to follow the rules, but Carlo continues to taunt the hospital chef by stealing food from the kitchen by night and watching cooking shows in the patient’s rooms during the day. One day Carlo breaks out in hives “…like popcorn bursting in a hot pan.” Carlo fantasizes how he got this disease. His mother figures it out. Carlo has spent too much time in the infectious disease part of the hospital and has contracted chicken pox. Poor Carlo takes this literally and fears that there are chickens under his skin.

The book is written with humor, colorful language and vibrant illustrations by Chanoa. Elementary school-age readers will be truly entertained. Carlo learns the hard way once more why it is important to follow the rules. Maybe his young readers will take note.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher and voluntarily decided to read and review the book giving my honest opinions for no compensation.

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LEARNING TO LIVE WITH A TODDLER

Zen Parents, Cooperative Toddlers: Your parenting tool set to staying calm, eliminating whining, and living a fun family life.

Written by Anna Anderson

ZenParents,pic

Sound like pie in the sky? This brief book is not meant to be the definitive how-to guide by an expert but a sympathetic parent who is sharing her experiences. The author offers some common sense approaches to maintaining sanity and family peace during this trying time. Andersen encourages parents to be nice to themselves, develop a positive attitude of love and cooperation, and to learn to let go and be more patient while letting go of stress. It is necessary to set home rules, but at the same time relax unrealistic expectations and give the young child choices within reason.

When communicating with a toddler, a parent needs to connect in a way that the child can understand and to listen as well as speak. Parents must learn the fine line between firmness and gentleness. Use the philosophy, “walk a mile in my shoes.” Toddlers are curious, but must also learn how to respect boundaries while exploring. Give them chores and realistic expectations to spark creativity.

Finally, the author sets forth scenarios in which toddlers do make unreasonable demands and recommends different approaches to handling them. By making the young child see that their behavior is inappropriate, ignoring it, and then astonishing them by doing something that is playful; you will allow your child to feel as if you are able to understand their thinking and not demand compliance with your way of doing things. If parents allow themselves to develop tools to handle stress and be grateful and proud of their children, life will become easier and more enjoyable

Andersen offers a free download of a morning and evening routine chart. I would recommend this book to parents, teachers, grandparents and daycare personnel as an easy to read helpful guide from which you will surely pick up at least one or two ideas you can use.

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RAISING A HEALTHY CHILD

Self-Esteem For Kids: Every Parent’s Greatest Gift: How to Raise Kids to Have Confidence in Themselves and Their Own Abilities

Written by Simeon Lindstrom

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The book will aid parents in building and developing a healthy sense of self-esteem in children ranging in age from toddlers to teens. Parents are the primary influence on a child’s self-esteem and self-confidence without which he will not be successful in school, work and everyday life. Although every child is different, the strategies and tips apply to all of them.

Lindstrom goes on to explain why self-esteem is important, how it develops in different stages of child development, and the do’s and don’ts for parents in facilitating the process. Then the author identifies the warning signs of low self-esteem that might come from within the child like self-critical comments and refusing to make decisions. Outside factors like bullying and negative reactions from teachers and peers could also be triggers. Perhaps the most important part of the book is the chapter on proven strategies for raising self-esteem giving parents access to the tools they need to address the problem and help their children cope with negative feelings.

I agree with the author that spending just fifteen minutes a day conversing with a child without distractions can have a huge impact on their self-esteem and self-confidence as well as provide an opportunity to convey parental love and enhance positive thinking. The author admits that there are times when a child’s low self-esteem are beyond the control of a parent. He presents a path for the parent which includes information on how to seek and find therapeutic options and then convince a child of its importance to his well-being.

This short book is well written and easy to follow. I believe it is a valuable resource for all parents, caregivers, teachers and counselors to keep on their bookshelf.

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A BOOK YOU NEED TO READ – BOOK BLAST

Megan'sbook

 

Synopsis

Megan’s book, Who Am I?  How My Daughter Taught Me to Let Go and Live Again, is about her journey into post-partum depression, anxiety disorder, panic attacks, stays in the psych ward, divorce, emotional abuse, domestic violence, law school, how she managed to graduate from law school and a beautiful little girl who emerged from all of this chaos.  

Author Bio

Megan Cyrulewski has been writing short stories ever since she was ten-years-old.  After attending Grand Valley State University, Megan eventually settled into a career in the non-profit sector for eight years.  She decided to change careers and went back to school to get her law degree from Thomas M. Cooley Law School.  While in school, she documented her divorce, child custody battle and postpartum depression struggles in her memoir. Megan lives in Michigan with her 3-year-old daughter who loves to dance, run, read, and snuggle time with Mommy.  Megan also enjoys her volunteer work with various organizations in and around metro-Detroit.

Excerpt

On January 18, 2012, we all convened in the courthouse for the Motion for Parenting Time hearing. My dad and I arrived with my attorney, but Tyler loved an audience so he brought his dad, step-mom, and his new on-again off-again girlfriend, Heather. Tyler walked in with his posse in tow, cocky as hell. It took all of two minutes for the judge to knock him off his feet.

The Judge addressed our respective attorneys. “Why are we here?”

“Your honor,” Tyler’s attorney began, “my client has clearly been denied his parenti—”

The Judge didn’t even let him finish. “How?” She turned to my attorney. “Don?”

“Your honor, as you can see in the divorce decree, there was supposed to be a review when the minor child turned twelve-months-old. The Defendant has ignored that review.”

“I—if I may, your honor,” Tyler’s attorney sputtered.

“I see the review in the decree. It’s here in black and white,” she told Tyler’s attorney. “What is the problem? Why didn’t you understand the review? Your client signed the divorce decree.”

Tyler’s attorney tried again. “But your honor—”

The judge cut him off. “There is to be a review conducted by the Friend of the Court referee assigned to the parties. Until then, the Defendant will continue his parenting time schedule as agreed upon in the divorce decree. Dismissed.”

And that was it. After eight police reports and numerous harassing text messages, phone calls, and e-mails, we won. As Don and Tyler’s attorney went to speak with the clerk to file the necessary paperwork, Don told us to wait for him outside the courtroom.

As we exited the courtroom, the hallway was so packed with people that my dad and I were only able to find enough space to lean against the wall. We were talking about the court proceedings when we looked up at saw Tyler and his new girlfriend standing right across from us.

“Why do you lie about everything?” Tyler screamed.

Heather walked up to me and stood about an inch from my face. “As a mother myself, you should be happy that Tyler is the father of your child.”

My jaw dropped. “I’m sorry but I don’t know you.”

She smirked. “Well you’re going to get to know me, bitch.”

Tyler made a big show of pulling her from me like I was going to punch her or something. By this time, everyone in the hallway was watching us. We were pure entertainment.

Heather continued her rant. “Two times in the psych ward, Megan? What a great mother you are.”

“Where is your mom, the real mother of our child?” Tyler screamed. “She’s the one who takes care of Madelyne.”

My dad and I tried to move away from Tyler and Heather but they followed us.

“Awww…” Heather mocked. “Do you have to take a Xanax because of your anxiety?”

“Go take your Xanax and sleeping pills, you drug addict,” Tyler shouted.

Finally, Don emerged from the courtroom and pulled us into a quiet corridor. He explained that I needed to call our referee to set-up a meeting to discuss a visitation schedule. I told Don about the verbal assault by Tyler and Heather. Don said he would call Tyler’s attorney to let him know that Heather would not be allowed in my house.

Upon leaving the courthouse, Heather screamed, “See you on Sunday, Megan.”

I turned toward her and said calmly, “I don’t know you, but you are not welcome in my home.”

That night, Tyler sent me multiple texts attacking my mothering skills, my supposed drug addictions, how he was going to fight for joint custody of Madelyne, how Heather would be accompanying him for his visitations, and a barrage of other insults:

  • “Get a life already”

  • “Don’t you have something better to do than wasting your parents’ money?”

  • “Go take your pills and relax, oh yeah, then your parents would have to watch our daughter. Oh yeah, they already do.”

  • “Go talk to your friends. Oh yeah, you don’t have any because of how crazy you are.”

  • “Interesting to know you’ve been to the hospital a couple of times. You really need to get it together.”

  • “Better go call your lawyer and make up some more stuff about me.”

  • “Don’t be mad at your sorry life.”

  • “I am sure living with Mom and Dad the rest of your life will be fun.”

  • “When you get a job, then you can pay me child support. Fun.”

I finally had to turn my phone off at midnight.

BUY LINKS:

FINDING ONE’S WAY

 

The Candle Star (Divided Decade Trilogy)

Written by Michelle Isenhoff

TheCandleStarpic

This is the first book in a trilogy examining the Civil War through the Underground railroad setting in Michigan in 1858. In this first volume, the protagonist is fourteen year old Emily whose petulant personality and insolent behavior has resulted in her parents’ shipping her off to stay with an uncle in Michigan. Emily has never been off the Ella Wood plantation in the Carolinas. She presumes her life will be much the same, and her faithful slave Zeke tries to make her comfortable.

Things turn out very differently. Emily will not have a tutor, she will have to walk to a school, do chores in her Uncle Issac’s inn, and learn to deal with free slaves who are her equal. Emily rebels at once, she steals a neighbor’s horse, skips school, and treats the household members as if they were “her slaves.” Her uncle refuses to give in to her; he cringes when she befriends slave bounty hunters from Virginia as her equals. Emily is curious to find out what her uncle writes in a small book hidden in a secret compartment. But gradually she must learn to respect another way of thinking, her black friend Malachi makes her realize that her way of thinking may be jaded. He encourages her to pursue her dreams of painting and not to limit her goals to become a proper Southern plantation wife.

Isenhoff has done her research. She introduces characters based on real prototypes like Frederick Douglass and George deBaptiste. Her language is smooth and polished. Take the following excerpt: “Emily looked the boy over. He had skin the color of strong tea before the cream was added, and his eyes were as dark as the midnight sky.” The reader quickly assimilates himself into the character. Only complaint I have is that the story line sometimes seems to move too slowly, but it is certainly not predictable. There are many twists and turns and lots of surprises before Emily is ready to return home to her plantation. Changes are on the horizon for the country. Will Emily be successful in acclimating herself to a changed order? What will happen to her uncle and staff at the River Inn?

I would recommend this book to children and adults age ten and up. There are lots of issues that middle grade students are facing that are addressed in the book irrespective of the difference in time period. Any reader who enjoys history, character study and good writing will enjoy this book series. Classroom teachers and librarians should consider it a good resource to a study of the pre-Civil War period from a humanistic point of view.

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