Posts tagged ‘mental health’

COVID19 WE CAN #WORKTOGETHER WHILE STAYING APART

FEELING OVERWHELMED AND ISOLATED?

DON’T KNOW HOW TO ORGANIZE FAMILY SCHEDULES WHILE WE ARE ALL WORKING FROM HOME?

Here are a few ideas to keep things running smoothly and making everyone in the family more productive.

Create a To-Do List the Night Before

Instead of waking up in the morning to make your to-do list, make your list the night before. This way you can go to bed relaxed and confident for the next day. You also wake up in the morning knowing exactly what you have planned for the day. You might also consider planning on Sunday night for the upcoming week. Then when you wake on Monday you have a plan in place.

Prioritize

Take a look at the tasks on your list. What tasks offer the largest return? What tasks offer the most value and achievement? For example, answering email or paying bills isn’t a task that offers a large return. However, making a sale or meeting with a client is a very productive task. Put your most profitable or results-oriented tasks first on your list.

Get a Good Night’s Sleep

The quality of your sleep is important to sustain your energy levels throughout your day. Good sleep means you’ll be fresh and energetic all day long. Creating a to-do list is a good way to help you get a good night’s sleep because you can put the day’s stresses to rest.

Also consider adding soothing nighttime rituals to your routine. For example, meditate, stretch or read before you go to bed. Keep a gratitude journal and write before you sleep. Go to bed and wake at the same time to help your body know what to expect.

Eat Healthy

The food you eat has a direct correlation to how energetic and productive you are. Junk food will make you sluggish. Healthy food will help you stay energized all day long. Feed your body well and it will respond by keeping you alert and energetic.

Get Organized      

If you spend half your time searching for files, names and numbers, you are wasting time. Make sure any items that you use on a regular basis are easy to grab from your desk chair or find in your computer. They should be easy to find and use.

Take Breaks

Productivity doesn’t mean working from sun-up to sundown. In fact, if you work without stopping, you’re likely to burn out. Instead, commit to taking a break every hour. Walk around or get some air to get the blood moving throughout your body.

Focus

Do you multi-task hoping it’ll make you more productive? Do you manage one task while your mind is already onto the next task? Both habits are unproductive. When you focus on what you’re doing, not only is the task more enjoyable, it also gets done faster and better.

Productivity is possible. With a little planning, attention, and self-care you can get more done in half the time. These tools are simple but effective. Try just one of these steps and watch your own personal productivity improve.

MEMORIES AND MYSTERIES

THE FLYING FROG

Written by David Yair

Illustrated by Ilana Graf and Natalie Jackson

This is book five of The Flying Frog series, but it stands alone as an interesting approach for children to understand Alzheimer disease. The Rimon children are a clever pair of siblings who are adept at solving mysteries. They accomplish this task with the help of a flying frog named Quack.

In Book Five of the series, Adam Shor is a retired carpenter who is beloved in his town. He is now in the advanced stages of Alzheimer disease. His wife. children and grandchildren watch over him. One day, he walks out of the garden gate. gets confused and lost. The whole town mobilizes to search for him. The Rimon children enlist the aid of Quack. They tie balloons to him and launch him into the forest.

As the story unfolds, children begin to understand the complexities of the disease and the emotional upheaval that it evokes in the family and friends. This story is an excellent way to introduce a discussion about the topic to children. There are a few endearing illustrations that portray the emotional impact of the tale. The book is short at under forty pages, but I would have liked to have seen larger print for the targeted middle-grade audience. Recommended especially for readers in the eight to twelve age range.

If you enjoyed reading this post, please subscribe by clicking on the word Follow or by hitting the orange RSS FEED button in the upper right-hand corner of this page.

RAISING A HEALTHY CHILD

Self-Esteem For Kids: Every Parent’s Greatest Gift: How to Raise Kids to Have Confidence in Themselves and Their Own Abilities

Written by Simeon Lindstrom

self-esteemforkids,pic

The book will aid parents in building and developing a healthy sense of self-esteem in children ranging in age from toddlers to teens. Parents are the primary influence on a child’s self-esteem and self-confidence without which he will not be successful in school, work and everyday life. Although every child is different, the strategies and tips apply to all of them.

Lindstrom goes on to explain why self-esteem is important, how it develops in different stages of child development, and the do’s and don’ts for parents in facilitating the process. Then the author identifies the warning signs of low self-esteem that might come from within the child like self-critical comments and refusing to make decisions. Outside factors like bullying and negative reactions from teachers and peers could also be triggers. Perhaps the most important part of the book is the chapter on proven strategies for raising self-esteem giving parents access to the tools they need to address the problem and help their children cope with negative feelings.

I agree with the author that spending just fifteen minutes a day conversing with a child without distractions can have a huge impact on their self-esteem and self-confidence as well as provide an opportunity to convey parental love and enhance positive thinking. The author admits that there are times when a child’s low self-esteem are beyond the control of a parent. He presents a path for the parent which includes information on how to seek and find therapeutic options and then convince a child of its importance to his well-being.

This short book is well written and easy to follow. I believe it is a valuable resource for all parents, caregivers, teachers and counselors to keep on their bookshelf.

If you enjoyed reading this post, please subscribe by clicking on the word Follow or by hitting the orange RSS FEED button in the upper right hand corner of this page.

%d bloggers like this: