Posts from the ‘Librarians’ Category

#VIRTUALREALITY #SECONDLIFE #CHILDRENBOOKAUTHORS

CHECK OUT OUR DISCUSSION OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG ADULT BOOK AUTHORS moderated by Draxtor Dupres

Nadine Kaadan

Margi Preus

Carole P. Roman

Barbara Ann Mojica aka LittleMissHISTORY

#GrowThroughIt #BLOG TOUR #GIVEAWAY #BOOKREVIEW

This book review and giveaway is in partnership with The Children’s Book Review. Please note that 100% of the profits from book sales are donated to COVID-19 relief efforts.

ABOUT THE BOOK

GROW THROUGH IT

Written by Jay Dee

Illustrated by Jacob Chalkley, Darren Geers, Feras Khagani, Mike Shaposhnikov, Ishmam Ahmed, and Axel Schmidt

Publisher’s Synopsis: Ellen is stuck at home. There’s no school and no friends, and Mom is working all the time. It seems terrible until she learns about the choice each day offers: GET through it or GROW through it. See how starting each day with purpose and gratitude can make all the difference! Created during the CV-19 pandemic, 100% of the proceeds from sales of this book are donated to coronavirus relief efforts.

Ages 5+ | Publisher: Kraine Kreative | May 17, 2020 | ISBN-13: 978-0989810876

PURCHASE LINKS

https://amzn.to/36kAr4D

MY REVIEW OF THE BOOK

ACCENTUATE THE POSITIVE

Grow Through It

This is the first children’s book on Covid -19, which I have read. Dee writes in a graphic novel style to portray in pictures and words the emotions and frustrations of an elementary school child in dealing with the pandemic.

Ellen feels angry because she cannot go to school and play with her friends or resume the lifestyle to which she is accustomed. Her mother tells her that she has a choice. Ellen can choose to spend her time complaining, watching TV, or hiding in her inside tent. Her other choice is to grow through this crisis by finding new opportunities to learn and help others in her community. Ellen struggles with this decision. She shifts back and forth between the two extremes. How can she stay positive? She desperately wants to see her grandmother to celebrate grandma’s special day.

This book speaks to the disappointments children are experiencing. Ellen’s mother provides a good example as to how parents may assist their children cope with this crisis. I would highly recommend it for elementary school age readers.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher and voluntarily agreed to read and review it with my honest opinions.

OFFICIAL LINKS

www.krainekreative.com

www.GrowThroughItBook.com 

Facebook.com/krainekreative

GIVEAWAY

Enter for a chance to win a copy of  Grow Through It, by Jay Dee and a group of six illustrators!

One (1) grand prize winner receives:

  • A paperback copy of Grow Through It.
  • A $50 donation will be made in the winner’s name to UNICEF for COVID-19 relief efforts.

Nine (9) winners receive:

  • A paperback copy of Grow Through It.

Giveaway begins May 25, 2020, at 12:01 A.M. MT and ends June 25, 2020, at 11:59 P.M. MT.

Enter the giveaway by clicking on the link below:
http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/3d5cb282171/

BLOG TOUR SCHEDULE

May 25The Children’s Book Reviewhttps://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/Kick-Off
May 26Word Spelunkinghttp://wordspelunking.blogspot.com/Book Review
May 27Tales of A Wanna-Be SuperHero Momhttp://wannabesuperheromom.blogspot.com/Guest Post
May 28Over Coffee Conversationshttps://www.gmarciano.blogspot.comGuest Post
May 29JrsbookreviewsHttp://www.jrsbookreviews.wordpress.comBook Review
June 1The Children’s Book Reviewhttps://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/Book Review
June 2Shooting Stars Magwww.shootingstarsmag.netInterview
June 3Barbara Ann Mojica’s Bloghttps://bamauthor.meBook Review
June 4Satisfaction for Insatiable Readershttp://insatiablereaders.blogspot.comGuest Post
June 5Fairview Elementary School (Library)https://fveslibrary.blogspot.com/Book Review
June 8Heart to Hearttynea-lewis.comBook Review
June 9icefairy’s Treasure Chesthttp://icefairystreasurechest.blogspot.com/Book Review
June 10Younger Family Funhttps://YoungerFamilyFun.comBook Review
June 11A Dream Within A Dreamhttp://adreamwithindream.blogspot.comBook Review
June 11Woodpecker Bookshttps://www.woodpeckerbooks.com/Book Review
June 12Confessions of a Book Addicthttp://www.confessionsofabookaddict.com/Giveaway

WHAT IS #AUDITORY PROCESSING DISORDER

As a special educator, I have worked with preschoolers and elementary school age children diagnosed with reading disabilities and speech language problems. I taught the Wilson Reading Program, which is a phonics based approach to reading. While I found it effective with many of my students, it did not meet the needs of all of them.

A lifelong book-lover, Dr. Karen Holinga’s interest in helping children learn to read began during her six years as a classroom teacher, where she saw how much some children struggled to master the skill. Her desire to solve the puzzle only increased during the twelve years she homeschooled her own children.

Eager to better understand the reading process, Dr. Karen pursued a doctorate in Developmental Reading, Curriculum, and Professional Development from The Ohio State University.

With Happy Cheetah Reading, she has taken all her expertise—years of classroom experience, years homeschooling, her doctoral research, and her extensive clinical practice—and crafted a simple plan. As The Reading Doctor, she has successfully helped over 25,000 children learn to read— many of whose parents had lost hope. She knows how some students struggle, and she knows how to help. 

I am presenting this program as a resource for parents and educators and not as an endorsement or beneficiary of any of its products.

As you might guess from the name, auditory processing relates to sound. But children with poor auditory processing are not usually hearing impaired. Rather, these children’s brains don’t interpret the incoming sounds correctly. 

Is There a Cure?

Auditory processing is a developmental issue. 

This means it’s like losing teeth, which is another developmental milestone. Children who lose their first teeth at age four are not “better” than those who lose their first teeth at age seven. If your five-year-old doesn’t have a loose tooth yet, you don’t get angry, or start Tooth Loosening Therapy. Teeth loss is developmental, and it will happen when it happens.

With auditory processing, it’s the same way. You can’t make it happen, so release yourself from any pressure. There is no appointment for you to make, no official diagnosis that will help. There is no fix for the neurology. 

Most children work through their auditory processing issues and eventually catch up with their peers, when their body is ready.

Symptoms of Poor Auditory Processing

If, as you read through these symptoms, one or two stand out to you, then assume that, yes, your child deals with auditory processing.

1) Poor phonemic awareness. A single sound is called a phoneme (FOE neem), and children who can’t hear the difference between sounds have “poor phonemic awareness.” This means they cannot easily separate or distinguish individual sounds, and have an especially hard time distinguishing between short vowel sounds, such as bet and bit

Children with poor phonemic awareness will probably not be able to determine which of these pairs of words rhyme:  

sock – sell 

rim – slim

sink – drink

tap – shirt 

These children can’t hear the wrong rhymes, and can’t guess the right rhymes. 

This also can show up in very slow letter sound acquisition. It took my son three years of daily work to (mostly) remember the 26 basic letter sounds and their written component.

2) Difficulty with word retrieval. My son would know what he wanted to say, but his brain couldn’t access the specific words. For example, he might say, “Hey, Mom, remember the book about the person who went on a trip?”

And based on the context of whatever we had recently been talking about, I could usually guess, “Do you mean the book about Chris taking the logs down the Mississippi in Swift Rivers?” 

But not always. “Hey, Mom, do you remember when we went to that place and rode on that thing?” could equally apply to the time when our family went to the amusement park and rode the tram, or to the airport and rode on the moving sidewalk, or to the lake and rode on the paddle board. Which sentence is my son trying to communicate? 

When children have difficulty with word retrieval, the specifics of language are missing, those clarifying and important words that differentiate experience. 

3) Unclear or delayed speech. Self-explanatory.

4) Delayed auditory processing. These children’s brains overload really easily, because they can’t process language quickly. 

In fact, some children process information 80% more slowly

Think about trying to do anything if your brain had slowed down 80%. How much less would you comprehend?

4) Poor auditory memory. Children with poor auditory memory don’t remember what they hear, so they miss a lot. 

If a parent says, “Go to your room, get your shoes, and meet me at the door,” the children will show up at the door, but without their shoes. 

This isn’t because they’re deliberately disobeying. They simply cannot remember.

On occasion, my son will have listened to almost all of a chapter book. Then, on page 250 of 300, he’ll ask about a key secondary character, “Now who was that again?” He more-or-less has understood the book, but he clearly doesn’t have specific ideas about the different characters.

5) Difficulty with hearing the number of syllables in a word. You may have heard the trick of clapping syllables, a clap for each syllable. So one clap for cat, two claps for tiger, three claps for beautiful, four claps for hyperactive

My son would guess: “Does computer have one syllable? Does cake have two?” It was astonishing to see all the ways he would contort his speech to make the syllable claps fit the word. 

When children can’t hear syllables, it makes reading programs that focus on syllables almost impossible. 

Does this sound like your child?

If this sounds like your child, I encourage you to keep reading. Some children, like my son, have both auditory processing delays, and the other challenge that we’ll cover tomorrow.

But if this sounds like your child, only one reading program on the market is going to help your child. Every Orton-Gillingham program, supposedly the “gold standard” for struggling readers, focuses on syllable division and rule memorization. For a student who has a hard time hearing and remembering the letters themselves, loading them down with rules is unhelpful at best, and destructive at worst. 

I am thrilled that a program exists that acknowledges and allows struggling readers to move forward, even with delayed auditory processing. 

The Happy Cheetah Reading System is designed to get your child up to speed as quickly as possible.  happycheetah.com

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BABY STEPS

I Am Not a Baby

Written by Bob Smith

Illustrated by Victoria M.

This is a short, cute picture book written from the point of view of a toddler. Preschoolers and toddlers are constantly trying to demonstrate they can do things independently. In this tale, Mike sets out to prove he can do everything adults can do. While the pictures and story clearly demonstrate that is not the case, Mike gives his readers inspiration and confidence.

Recommended as a bedtime story or read-aloud book to encourage self-esteem for two to five-year-olds.

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#SUCCESSINSIGHT

Check out my newest podcast discussion with Howard Fox.

UNDER THE COVER…

SPIES, CODE BREAKERS, AND SECRET AGENTS: A WORLD WAR II BOOK FOR KIDS

Written by Carole P. Roman

Illustrated by Alessandra Santelli

Author-winning children’s book author, Carole P. Roman has hit it out of the park with this nonfiction book. This book provides a comprehensive of about the importance of spies during World War II.

Chapter One begins with the background and causes leading to the war’s outbreak. The importance of spies in winning the war in both the Atlantic and Pacific spheres is the focus of the book.

Young readers receive a clear picture of the training, weapons, and tools used in spycraft. Secret armies and the intelligence organizations operations in each country are discussed. Illustrations provide visuals that provide greater insight.

I found the chapters featuring biographical portraits of the spies one of the most interesting sections. Spies worked in many professions. Chef Julia Child and author Graham Greene operated undercover. Roman discusses double agents and the Native Americans who broke the Japanese code. Before closing, the author explains how some wartime spy organizations still exist and how they have adopted modern tools of technology.

The Glossary explains terms used and provides more websites to explore. It also lists espionage monuments and museums that may be visited. For inquisitive minds looking to find out even more, Roman includes a bibliography of the resources she used in her research.

I would recommend this book to children who love adventure, espionage, and history. It’s a perfect read for middle-grade students, but an eye-opener for adults as well.

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#PLEASEVOTE

I’m so excited because my book, Little Miss HISTORY Travels to TOMBSTONE ARIZONA was just nominated for the 2020 Readers Choice Awards contest by TCK Publishing!

Please vote for it at https://www.tckpublishing.com/2020-readers-choice-voting…/12.

My book is on page 12 Middle and Young Adult Books for Children.

My Friend Moose’r McDan blog tour and #Giveaway

Sponsored by The Children’s Book Review and Sky Danley

ABOUT THE BOOK

My Friend Moose’r McDan

Written by Sky Danley

Illustrated by Alli Coate

Publisher’s Synopsis: An aggressive hunter bear meets a gentle moose who is looking for a new friend. The moose is so friendly that the bear decides to drop his gun and stop hunting altogether. Instead, the bear learns that it’s more fun to just hang out with a new friend, playing games and enjoying nature. However, after the fall colors change, it’s time for the bear to go back home. The gentle moose is sad because he lost his play friend, so he is again looking for a new one. He invites whoever is reading the book to become his new friend.

Ages 5-6 | Publisher: Sky Danley Productions | October 8, 2019 | ISBN-13: 978-0997345100

PURCHASE LINK

Amazon


MY REVIEW OF THE BOOK

HUNTING FOR A GOOD FRIEND

A bear is out hunting in the woods when he comes across a moose who is smiling from ear to ear. The bear is puzzled by this moose, Moose’r McDan, who requests his friendship.  The hunter decides to think about this and puts his gun aside. Will the hunter and the hunted become friends? Is it possible to turn potential enemies into friends?

This delightful picture book contains charming, colorful illustrations and rhyming text in bold text that is easy on the eyes of young readers. Recommended especially for preschoolers and kindergarten readers but also a fun read-aloud for beginning readers.

I received an advance review copy of this book from the publisher and voluntarily decided to read and review with my honest opinions.

TOUR SCHEDULE

December 6The Children’s Book Reviewhttps://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/Kick-Off
December 6Over Coffee Conversationshttps://www.gmarciano.blogspot.comInterview
December 9Younger Family Funhttps://youngerfamilyfun.comBook Review
December 10Word Spelunkinghttp://wordspelunking.blogspot.com/Book Review
December 11Barbara Ann Mojica’s Bloghttps://bamauthor.meBook Review
December 12The Children’s Book Reviewhttps://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/Book Review
December 13Fairview Elementary School (Library)https://fveslibrary.blogspot.com/Book Review
December 17icefairy’s Treasure Chesthttp://icefairystreasurechest.blogspot.com/Book Review
December 18Rosco’s Reading Roomauthorshanagorian.comInterview
December 27Satisfaction for Insatiable Readershttp://insatiablereaders.blogspot.comBook Review

Bianca SchulzeFounder, The Children’s Book Reviewwww.thechildrensbookreview.com | growingreaders@thechildrensbookreview.com
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GIVEAWAY

Enter for a chance to win a copy of My Friend Moose’r McDan and a plush moose!

Three (3) grand prize winners receive:

  • A copy of My Friend Moose’r McDan
  • A plush moose

Giveaway begins December 6, 2019, at 12:01 A.M. MT and ends January 6, 2020, at 11:59 P.M. MT.

Open to legal residents of the 50 United States and the District of Columbia, who are thirteen years of age or older in their state or territory of residence at the time of entry. Void where prohibited by law.

Sky Danley Productions is responsible for prize fulfillment.

Click on the link below to enter the giveaway

https://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/weblog/2019/12/my-friend-mooser-mcdan-by-sky-danley-awareness-tour.html

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

OFFICIAL LINKS

www.skydanley.com

Facebookhttps://www.facebook.com/skydanleyproductions/

Instagramhttps://www.instagram.com/skydanleyproductions/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/SkyDanley

#Building Bridges

Aspergers Books for Kids: Joey the Weather Boy – A Story About Asperger Syndrome

Written by Dr. Sam Caron, PhD

Illustrated by Jeremy Caron

The author of this boy is a psychologist/ventriloquist who has been working with children and their families for thirty years. As a special educator, I applaud his approach. Dr. Caron has used this fictional short story to address the child and parents and then provided an interactive guide to implementing its lessons.

Joey is an eight-year-old boy who does not look at people and is obsessed with the weather. He has an uncanny talent to predict all aspects of the weather. Joey could talk about nothing else. His parents, teachers, and classmates could not understand him. That was okay with Joey because he preferred to be alone.

Joey’s parents took him to Dr. Caron who introduced Joey to Elwood, his puppet. Joey was able to relate to Elwood. With Dr. Caron’s help, Joey introduced a kids’ weather program and began speech therapy. Joey became more comfortable communicating with others. Children and adults recognized his talents.

This book goes a long way in helping parents, teachers, and children to understand Asperger Syndrome. Children who are bored easily, hyperactive or impulsive are not behavior problems. Books like these go a long way to eliminate preconceived notions. I highly recommend this series of books as a good start to building bridges with families who deal with the problem and members of the general population who misunderstand its symptoms.

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A HANDBOOK FOR SPECIAL CHILDREN AND THEIR PARENTS

Roadmap to Navigating Your Child’s Disability
Written by Chrissie Kahan
Illustrated by Blueberry Illustrations

I would heartily recommend this book for parents and educators who are interested in navigating the tricky world of special education. For parents who suspect that something is just not right, this book provides an introduction to the types of disabilities and treatments available. Teachers who have not been trained in the field of special education need a basic understanding of the problems and resources available to treat them.

This book is divided into three sections. The first part explores the endless jargon employed in the educational testing, developing the plan, and implementing the Individual Educational Plan that each diagnosed child is entitled to have. This is a very scary and confusing process for parents. In the second section, the author explains who are the members of the team, how long the process takes, and how a parent can successfully advocate for their child. The third section is an alphabetical listing of the most common disabilities found in children, accommodations available within the school, reference links to resources, and how to reinforce what is taught in the school setting right in the home.

The world of special education is often written in legal language fraught with difficulty to understand. The way an IEP is developed and implemented varies greatly from state to state and school district. This book gives parents and teachers a good introduction and provides a readable reference source. As an educator with forty years of experience in general and special education, I would highly recommend this handbook to those about to become familiar with the special education world.

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