Posts from the ‘preschool’ Category

SHH….DON’T TELL

Maya Knows a Secret

Written by Daniel Georges

One day Maya asks her dad, “What is a secret?” He explains that a secret occurs when someone else tells you something that nobody else knows. Maya wonders then how does one know it is a secret. Dad explains that they will tell you not to tell anyone. Maya is dying to know a secret, but no one seems to want to tell her one. Finally, she finds one when a storekeeper reveals his secret, but Maya is frustrated when she accidentally reveals the secret to a friend.

The illustrations in this book are adorable and the message is a “spot on” way to explain the concept of a secret to young children. Highly recommended for primary school aged readers.

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DANCING TO HER OWN TUNE

Willa the Ballerina

Written by Leela Hope

Willa the Wolf loves dancing ballet, but she feels that her fellow swan ballerinas are so much more talented than she. Cynthia, the lead swan, tells Willa that she looks like a fool and should leave the school. Willa goes off into the woods to have a good cry. She meets up with Tommy the Toad who encourages her to practice and not to worry. Once Willa stops worrying, she becomes a proficient dancer. Willa returns to the dance school before the recital. There will be a surprise in store for Willa and her readers.

This is a cute picture book that teaches preschoolers not to worry what others think, to work hard, and develop self-confidence. While it probably did not need to be written in rhyme, that makes it a good read aloud. Simple but effective illustrations convey the message. Recommended as a bedtime story or read aloud, especially for preschoolers but can be used with children a bit older.

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I CAN DO IT!

Little Bunny – I Can

Written and Illustrated by Alexandra Dannenmann

Translated by S. Paterson

 

This is a cute little picture book for toddlers that features a little bunny as the protagonist. Each page features the bunny with an I can sentence that demonstrates skills mastered. Some of these skills are simple, like brushing teeth, getting dressed by oneself, and throwing a ball. Others are fanciful like taming lions and protecting a princess from a dragon. The book can serve as encouragement to acquire skills yet unlearned or as a self-esteem book rewarding toddlers for achieved goals.

Recommended as a read aloud or bedtime story for children ages two through four.

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PROBLEM SOLVERS FOR PARENTS OF YOUNG CHILDREN

Lee and his Big Hair

Written and Illustrated by Leela Hope

This is another book in the series about a little boy named Lee who lives near a lake. Lee has a penchant for getting into trouble. He is strong-willed and obstinate. Lee refuses to comb or brush his hair. One of his favorite pastimes is playing in the mud. Lee also refuses to cut his hair. One day he rolls around in the mud. When Lee gets up, everything is stuck to him. He runs to the lake to wash the mud off, but he cannot get the mud or the debris that is stuck in his hair. A barber is summoned. Readers will be shocked at what he finds in Lee’s hair.

This book is written in rhyme with humor that children and adults alike will enjoy. Perfect for teaching children the importance of good hair grooming. Recommended for ages three through seven.

 

Lee Has To Stop Eating Candy

Written and Illustrated by Leela Hope

Lee is a young boy who decides to take advantage of the fact that his mom is busy gardening. He spies a tin full of candy and decides to finish it all. Of course, he gets really sick. Lee’s mom finds him in a sugar trance on the floor. The doctor has never seen a case as bad as this. Lee is forced to drink a concoction of healthy fruits and vegetables. A difficult lesson to learn that will not be forgotten.

This book is written to teach children the value of good nutrition and that too much of a good thing has consequences. Colorful illustrations and large font make this book a good choice as a beginning reader or picture book. Recommended for ages preschool through primary grades.

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ERRATIC BEHAVIOR

Zachary and the Great Potato Chase

Written by Junia Wonders

Illustrated by Giulia Lombardo

 

Zachary is a clever, industrious rat who lives under the floorboards of a bakery which provides him with tasty treats. He is careful never to be greedy, eating only one pastry each day so as not to arouse suspicion. Zachary is content, but he has no friends because he refuses to share his treats.

One day a new delivery truck arrives at the bakery. Once Zachary tastes a potato, he is hooked on the taste. He becomes greedy taking more than his fair share and storing them in his lair. When the baker discovers his potatoes missing, Zachary will be found out. There will be huge consequences to pay.

This book is written in crisp rhyme that works well and the illustrations are bright and clever. The weakness lies in the fact that the connection between potatoes and the change in behavior is not explained. No reason is given for Zachary’s decision to change his relationship with fellow rats at the end of the story.

This book is a good read-aloud choice or bedtime story for preschoolers and early elementary school readers.

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RUNNING TOWARD HOME

Rosie the Runaway Raccoon (Not So Serious Jack Series Book 6)

Written by Jack Thompsen

 

Rosie the Raccoon believes that she has a talent for running. She decides that she wants to run against the other animals in the town race. Rosie is eager to win her parents’ approval and asks her mom to make her something special to wear. But Rosie’s mom gets busy at work and forgets her promise. To make matters worse, neither of Rosie’s parents take off time from work to attend her race. Rosie is proud to finish third, but her achievement is overshadowed by the disappointment she feels in what she perceives to be her parents’ lack of interest.

Rosie decides to make plans to run away. She decides that Rome would be the perfect spot. When Rosie overhears her parents talking about the race, she is shocked to learn their true feelings leading to an unexpected turn of events.

This picture book written in rhyme is intended for early elementary school-age children. The story is cute, even if the rhymes are sometimes forced and uneven. Recommended as a bedtime or read aloud story for children ages four through eight.

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#WinnerWednesday

Two more winners in the Easy Reader and Early Chapter categories:

Easy Reader

ONE SENTENCE SAYS IT ALL

I Like the Farm

Written and illustrated by Shelley Rotner

 

 

 

 

This book is a Step A Guided Reading book which features one sentence I like the…… Blanks are filled in with the names of familiar farm animals. There are full-page multicultural photographs of a child with the associated animal. Especially recommended for preschool and kindergarten children just beginning to read who love animals.

 

 

Early Chapter Book

No Need to Be Perfect

Princess Cora and the Crocodile

Written by Laura Amy Schlitz

Illustrated by Brian Floca

Poor Princess Cora is a victim of parents who are obsessed with her development into the role of future ruler of the kingdom. Cora is beset with a nanny who is obsessed with cleanliness and forces her to take three baths a day, a mother who forces her to read boring books all day, and a father who wants her to be strong and forces her to skip rope every day. When Cora requests a dog for a pet, her parents are horrified. She writes a note to her fairy godmother asking her to intervene. To her surprise and dismay, the next day a crocodile is delivered to her in a cardboard box.

This crocodile assures her that he will take charge and teach her tormentors a lesson. He demands only to be fed cream puffs as payment. So, Cora escapes into the woods for a day of adventure, climbing trees, eating strawberries, picking buttercups, and getting dirty. In the meantime, her pet crocodile is taking revenge on the nanny, the queen, and the king. At the end of the day when Cora returns she makes her request once more. What has happened at the castle? Have the adults learned a lesson? How will Cora be treated in the future?

This story presents the inner conflicts of Cora, and the adult versus child conflict clearly. Cora is a strong female role model, who is also obedient and respectful. The soft watercolor illustrations with a vintage feel are soft and appealing. The crocodile character adds humor and a hint of naughtiness. I would especially recommend this chapter book for second and third graders who are comfortable with the seventy-page length and some challenging vocabulary.

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