Posts from the ‘rhyming stories’ Category

LESSONS FROM THE ANIMAL KINGDOM

THE PARROT: Short lessons and fables for children: Fable Collection Volume #2

Written and Illustrated by Christy Astremsky

This book contains a collection of five animal fables that teach children lessons about themselves and others. In the first story, the parrot mouths words he has been taught over and over, but the words have little worth. When the parrot escapes from his owners, he can do nothing more than repeat those inane words, he finds that others think little of him. The second story features a zebra who gets lost and finds himself among others unlike himself. He discovers that it is okay to be different. The sparrow and the pigeon teach children what true friendship entails, while the tiger and jackal story teaches to beware of letting one’s guard down. The last story features a butterfly who has a habit of taking from others without ever giving something in return.

The rhyming stories are short and have a few illustrations so the collection might appeal to a beginning reader. Parents and teachers could use the fables on issues that they would like to open with children or students for discussion or intervention. I would especially recommend the book for ages seven through ten though older children who enjoy animal stories will find them appealing.

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WISHES + WORK = SUCCESS

Goodnight Wishes!

Written by Leea Baltes

Illustrated by Elia Glinski

A family of mice lived in a rickety old farmhouse that suited their needs perfectly. One day people came and began tearing their home down. Mama mouse placed her children and some food in a basket and ran down to the lake. She wished upon the stars and moon to help her find a way to solve her plight. Suddenly, she heard a screeching sound. A truck swerved to avoid hitting an animal, and a large box fell off the truck. The moonlight illuminated a hollow tree that would make a perfect home. Upon exploring the contents of the box, Mama finds all the materials she needs to furnish their new home. She urges her children to make a wish upon the heavens because when you make a wish and are willing to work hard good things will follow.

This tale teaches children that wishing alone is not enough, one must work hard to achieve success. Christian parents might explain the moral in a Christian contest. The illustrations are done in beautiful watercolors. The rhyming text is crisp and sharp. Recommended for primary grade children.

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A BIGGER BUCKET

How Big is Your Bucket?

Written by Todd Weaver

Daddy Lion decides that he will have a contest for his three young cubs. He challenges each to find the biggest bucket for The Autumn Harvest Festival. Ashley, Alex, and Jacob each have a plan. They scurry off to complete their task before dinner. Alex secures the car wash bucket, Ashley decides on the laundry bucket, but Jacob methodically scours the town until he comes upon the mayor’s bucket for tomorrow’s parade, which he borrows to show his father. Daddy Lion fills all the buckets to the top with toys and candy. The children wisely choose to share their treats with the whole town.

This book is written in rhyme that is sometimes not to the point and a bit difficult to follow. I would also suggest a larger font size so that a young reader could follow more easily. Recommended for preschoolers and primary grade readers.

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FRUSTRATED?

THE CHICK WHO COULD NOT KICK

Written by Tim Zak

 

This is an exciting day at the chicken coop. soccer tryouts are about to begin. Chuck desperately wants to make the team. He tries his best but his legs are shorter than the rest of the chicks. Chuck refuses to give up, even though everyone else is laughing at him. Chuck comes up with a plan that just might provide a solution to his problem and help the team.

This is a simple book with two lines of rhyming text on each page. Some of the rhymes come off as forced. Recommended for toddlers and preschoolers, particularly children who love soccer.

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COW CONNUDRUM

MEOW SAID THE COW

WRITTEN BY SARAH MAZOR

ILLUSTRATED BY ABIRA DAS

This is the second book in the Auntie Lily bedtime silly story collection. I liked it even more than the first. The lead character is a silly cow who tries to imitate other animals like a cat, hen, donkey, cheetah, monkey, snake and frog, to name just a few. In the process, children learn the characteristics of many animals. Rhymes are crisp and sharp, and the alliteration allows the sounds to roll off the tongue when reading aloud. Adults will enjoy this one as much as the children who are listening.

Illustrations are vivid and expressive, allowing even the youngest child to clearly get the message. This book is a perfect choice for an older sibling reading to a younger brother or sister. Perhaps my favorite part is the riddle section at the end that asks the child to answer ten riddles. After reading the book a few times, many readers will be able to create their own riddles. This series is a clever, creative, interactive approach to learning. Highly recommended as a bedtime story or read aloud for toddlers, preschoolers, and elementary school age children.

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IMAGINATIVE AND CREATIVE

Jess and Wiggle (Imaginata Children’s Books Book 1)

Written and illustrated by Uvi Poznansky

Jess is a beautiful young child, but she lacks the ability to smile. She has an active imagination. One day Jess invents a friend that she calls Wiggle. Wiggle is a ribbon-like creature. Jess invokes a contest to see which of them will break down and smile first. I won’t ruin the surprise by revealing the ending.

The artwork is beautiful, soft and charming containing rhymes that are in sync. While the text font is beautiful, I did find it difficult to read at some points. There is a standard print version at the end of the tale. The targeted audience is children ages three to six, but older children will enjoy it as well.

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WELCOMING A NEW SIBLING…

I’M A BIG BROTHER NOW

Written by Michael Gordon

Henry is excited when his mother informs him that he is about to be a big brother. He is ecstatic when mom brings Mia home from the hospital. Henry envisions sharing everything with his new sister, but he is soon disappointed when she seems to do nothing but cry. Mom reassures him that soon that will change. Henry is patient; he is elated when his sister grows into a best friend.

This is the perfect way for parents to introduce a new sibling to the family and model appropriate behavior. Recommended especially for children in the preschool population but it could also be shared with older children.

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