Posts tagged ‘confidence’

LEADERSHIP SKILLS SERIES #10 How to Be An Effective Leader in the Workplace

A leader in the workplace means setting a good example for others and/or heading up office programs and projects. It does not necessarily mean being a boss, manager, supervisor, or other “official” position, although it can mean that.

Here are some tips and ideas on how to be a leader in the workplace.

Be Confident

“Never let them see you sweat.” No one is perfect; but appearing confident inspires others to trust you and take your advice. Appear self-assured by not talking too much about your fears and concerns. Instead, talk to friends outside of the workplace about your uncertainties.

See the Good in Others

Always observe the good traits of other employees in the workplace. If you need to put certain people in charge of certain tasks, it pays to know who will do well with what task. You also may see potential in a co-worker and challenge him or her by requesting a task that might be a bit outside the scope of his or her current responsibilities. This improves the overall skill set of the workforce, and helps build self-esteem in your co-workers.

Don’t Be Afraid to Delegate

There’s a difference between being a people person and being a people pleaser. Being a people person means you have a genuine love for people, but you’re not afraid to ask people to do things. Being a leader doesn’t mean doing everything yourself; it means you are comfortable giving up some control and delegating tasks to others.

Appreciate Co-Workers

No one wants to work for or with someone who doesn’t appreciate them. If you let everyone know you appreciate what they’ve done and how they’ve given their time and talents, it can go a long way. Remember that there would be no leaders if there weren’t any followers. People who are appreciated may be more likely to follow your lead next time.

Problem Solving

If you step up with ideas on how to solve dilemmas or problems, and have resourceful ideas about how to accomplish something, then speak up. Employers value the ability to think through a problem and find a creative solution. This is a valuable leadership quality that demonstrates you have what it takes to be an effective leader in the workplace.

HOW TO FOSTER LEADERSHIP SKILLS IN CHILDREN – #9 What Happens When You Need to Deal with Adults?

Keys to Being an Effective Leader of Fellow Adults

An entirely different approach is called for, but some of the principles are the same no matter what age you’re leading.

Maybe you are going to be training a group of adults for a specific job, or perhaps you have to organize a community consignment sale. Maybe you need to find volunteers for a work or church function. There numerous situations where adults need to lead adults. Here are some keys to being an effective leader of your fellow adults.

Know Where You’re Going

No one wants to follow someone who has no idea where they’re going! Having a goal or vision is essential. It’s possible that goals may evolve or change as you go forward – it’s good to be flexible, too – but when you start out, having a clear vision can inspire others to follow you. If you really believe in it and know it can be done, your enthusiasm tends to be infectious. People like to get on board with someone who knows how to fly the plane!

Listen

As noted above, it’s good to be flexible, and that’s where listening comes in. As you express your vision and goal, even if it’s just getting things done well and on time, it’s a good idea to listen to the input of others. Someone might point out something you hadn’t taken into consideration, or he/she might have a good point about your choice of venue.

Obviously, a good leader can’t please every person’s whim, but you can take people’s concerns into consideration. If everyone seems to be saying the same thing, maybe you should change your plans a bit! People tend to appreciate a leader who listens, even if it doesn’t always mean change.

Clear Steps

In addition to a clear goal, you’ll need clear steps on how to reach that goal (or multiple goals). Explaining a “contagious” vision is great, but teaching people how you plan to realize that vision is just as important. It can seem unrealistic if you cannot clearly outline your plan. Break it down into manageable steps to present to the members in your group. A critical part of this, of course, is being organized.

Confidence

If you don’t believe in what you’re doing, how can you expect others to follow you? Make sure you are confident and certain of your plan and your methods. While it’s not a good idea to be so confident that you refuse to listen to anyone or pay attention to their concerns; demonstrating confidence and a clear vision, is contagious. Be sure of yourself and the goals that you want to accomplish.

If you enjoyed reading this post, please subscribe by clicking on the word Follow or by hitting the orange RSS FEED button in the upper right-hand corner of this page.

Check out all my learning opportunities at http://www.LittleMissHISTORY.com

TAKING ONE GIANT STEP FORWARD

MAYBE ONE STEP BACKWARD…. MY APOLOGIES!

My computer crashed and I have been down 2 1/1 days. So this post and everything else is late!

Bounce: Help Your Child Build Resilience and Thrive in School, Sports, and Life

Written by Dr. Kate Lund

The primary focus in this book is to teach parents, teachers, and community leaders how to foster resilience in the early stages in life so that children can develop their full potential. Children need to learn how to bounce back from misfortune and adversity in order to continue to move forward and ultimately achieve maximum potential. Young people must develop a tool box of coping skills to manage their frustrations and emotions. Lund presents seven pillars including navigating friendships and social pressures, sustaining focus and attention skills, developing courage, the motivation to succeed, and a spirit of confidence that will lead to optimism and continued forward momentum.

The author bases her book on her own personal experiences in overcoming challenges and studies of elementary school children as a psychologist for the past fifteen years. Lund includes a short autobiography and a list of resources for further study at the conclusion of her book. I would recommend this book to parents and teachers as well as anyone interested in developing the full potential of society’s future leaders.

If you enjoyed reading this post, please subscribe by clicking on the word Follow or by hitting the orange RSS FEED button in the upper right hand corner of this page.

%d bloggers like this: