Posts from the ‘homeschooling’ Category

TREE SCIENCE

Can a Tree Be Blue?

Written and illustrated by Audrey Sauble

A delightful science book about trees targeted for preschoolers and primary grade children. The author poses the question, can trees be blue? and goes on to examine different types of trees and the colors of their leaves. She explains that many trees change colors in the fall. Winter changes them into grays and browns. Sauble reminds readers about evergreens and how they retain their green leaves. Just when the reader concludes no leaves are blue, the author introduces a surprise.

The illustrations are simple but explain the text appropriately. I enjoyed the interactive features of searching for bugs hidden throughout the pages and the scavenger hunt activity. This is a fun book to add to a science homeschool or distance-learning curriculum.

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MONSTERS BEGONE

The Night the Monsters Came: A Fun Way to Teach Kids Healthy Habits as Part of Their Bedtime Routine

Written by Junia Wonders

Illustrated by Lisa Ciccone

Siblings Jack and Joy are getting ready for bed when Jack warns his sister, the monsters are outside and hungry. He dresses as a wizard and Joy puts on her fairy dress and crown.

As the monsters barge through the door, the children are steadfast. They warn the monsters they are not appealing targets because they follow good hygiene. Why does that turn the monsters off? Read the book to find out.

The rhymes are clever with extensive use of onomatopoeia and bright colors outlining new vocabulary. Illustrations are appropriate and colorful. I highly recommend the book for toddlers and primary grade children.

#AWHALEOFTHEWILD Book Tour and GIVEAWAY

In partnership with The Children’s Book Review and HarperCollins Children’s Books.

ABOUT THE BOOK

A Whale of the Wild

Written by Rosanne Parry

Publisher’s Synopsis: In the stand-alone companion to the New York Times–bestselling A Wolf Called Wander, a young orca whale must lead her brother on a tumultuous journey to be reunited with their pod. This gorgeously illustrated animal adventure novel explores family bonds, survival, global warming, and a changing seascape. Includes information about orcas and their habitats.

For Vega and her family, salmon is life. And Vega is learning to be a salmon finder, preparing for the day when she will be her family’s matriarch. But then she and her brother Deneb are separated from their pod when a devastating earthquake and tsunami render the seascape unrecognizable. Vega must use every skill she has to lead her brother back to their family. The young orcas face a shark attack, hunger, the deep ocean, and polluted waters on their journey. Will Vega become the leader she’s destined to be?

A Whale of the Wild weaves a heart-stopping tale of survival with impeccable research on a delicate ecosystem and threats to marine life. New York Times-bestselling author Rosanne Parry’s fluid writing and Lindsay Moore’s stunning artwork bring the Salish Sea and its inhabitants to vivid life. An excellent read-aloud and read-alone, this companion to A Wolf Called Wander will captivate fans of The One and Only Ivan and Pax.

Includes black-and-white illustrations throughout, a map, and extensive backmatter about orcas and their habitats.

Ages 8-12 | Publisher: Greenwillow Books | September 1, 2020 | ISBN-13: 9780062995926

PURCHASE LINK

Amazon: https://amzn.to/2EGm159

Audible: https://amzn.to/3hH2EHu

Bookshop.org: https://bookshop.org/a/2078/9780062995926

My opinion about A Whale of the Wild

This book drew me in from the opening chapter. The personified characters make you feel you a member of the whale pod. A compelling adventure that also provides readers with a wealth of knowledge about the dangers of life in the ocean. I highly recommend this beautiful book for elementary and middle-grade audiences. That doesn’t mean adults won’t enjoy it just as much!

A Whale of the Wild is at the top of my book list on the subject of whales. You will find other suggestions as you read on in the blog post.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Rosanne Parry is the author of the novels Heart of a Shepherd and Last of the Name, among other acclaimed titles. She lives with her family in an old farmhouse in Portland, Oregon, and writes in a treehouse in her backyard. www.rosanneparry.com

ABOUT THE ILLUSTRATOR

Lindsay Moore is an artist and writer with roots in Northern Michigan. She studied marine biology and fine art at Southampton College on Long Island and figure drawing at the Art Students League of New York, and earned her master of science in medical and scientific illustration from Medical College of Georgia, now Augusta University. Lindsay Moore lives with her family in Bowling Green, Ohio.

GIVEAWAY

Enter for a chance to win a copy of Rosanne Parry’s A Whale of the Wild!

Five (5) winners receive:

  • A copy of A Whale of the Wild, by Rosanne Parry

Giveaway begins September 1, 2020, at 12:01 A.M. MT and ends September 15, 2020, at 11:59 P.M. MT.

Click on the link below:

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/3d5cb282181

Interested in finding additional great books about whales?

Here are a few suggestions:

Song for a Whale 

Lynne Kelly 

Ages 8-12 

In the spirit of modern-day classics like Fish in a Tree and Counting by 7s comes the Schneider Family Book Award-winning story of a deaf girl’s connection to a whale whose song can’t be heard by his species, and the journey she takes to help him. 

National Geographic Readers: Great Migrations Whales 

Lynn Marsh 

  • Grade Level : 2 – 4 

Over the course of their 70-year lifespan, sperm whales will easily travel the circumference of the Earth in search of food and the need to breed and find a mate. Males will travel as far north as the Bering Sea and as far south as Antarctica in order to find enough food to sustain their ways of live—up to 700 squid a day! Along the way, these massive beasts battle 30-feet-long giant squids, and each other, to sustain their ways of life. 

Whales, Dolphins and Porpoises 

Mark Carwindine 

Illustrated Martin Camm 

Reference book for all ages 

Authoritative text, detailed illustrations, and a systematic approach make DK’s Smithsonian Handbook of Whales, Dolphins, and Porpoises the most comprehensive and concise pocket guide to cetaceans. With more than 900 illustrations, this visual recognition guide is designed to make identification as simple and accurate as possible. 

This book is one of a series covering plants, animals, and other natural phenomena from around the world and is published in association with the Smithsonian Institution. 

Baby Belluga (Raffi Songs to Read) Board Book 

Written by Raffi 

Illustrated by Ashley Wolff 

Age one through preschool 

Raffi’s most popular and beloved song about the “little white whale on the go” is available in a sturdy board book edition–just the right size for babies and toddlers! 
 
Singing supports and encourages even the youngest child’s speech and listening skills, which makes Baby Beluga perfect for early learning. Join this adorable baby whale in a busy day at sea, culminating in a warm mother-child bedtime ending. With its delightful illustrations, this is the ideal sing-along for a whole new generation of readers. 

Wally Whale’s Mighty Tail: A Book about Happiness 

Written by Kim Linette 

Illustrated by James Loram 

A Multicultural Book for Elementary Readers

At least that’s what Koa hears, and so he sets out in search of Wally Whale and the valuable knowledge that he hopes Wally will share. 
 
Determined to discover Wally’s secret to being mighty, Koa follows the whale through waves and reefs, never knowing the truth was inside him all along! 
 
Wally the Whale helps Koa – the little island warrior – learn the real secret to being mighty! And you already have it inside! 

It’s a lesson of emotional intelligence that is essential for any child—including Koa, who learns as he journeys through the Pacific with Wally Whale. 

Get to know the entire EQ Explorer’s Series—including how we donate 100% of profits to help underserved kids around the world. 

Tour Schedule for A Whale of the Wild

September 1The Children’s Book Reviewhttps://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/Book Review
September 2Tales of A Wanna-Be SuperHero Momhttp://wannabesuperheromom.blogspot.com/Book Review
September 3Over Coffee Conversationshttps://gmarciano.blogspot.comBook List
September 4Jrsbookreviewshttps://jrsbookreviews.wordpress.com/Book Review
September 5Fairview Elementary School (Library)https://fveslibrary.blogspot.com/Book Review
September 6Glass of Wine, Glass of Milkhttp://glassofwineglassofmilk.blogspot.com/Book Review
September 7The Children’s Book Reviewhttps://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/Book List
September 8Prologuehttp://dccmealy.com/Book Review
September 9Barbara Ann Mojica’s Bloghttps://bamauthor.meBook List
September 10Heart to Hearthttps://tynea-lewis.com/Book Giveaway
September 11Word Spelunkinghttp://wordspelunking.blogspot.com/Book List
September 12Satisfaction for Insatiable Readershttps://insatiablereaders.blogspot.comBook Review
September 12Library Lady’s Kid Lithttps://janemouttet.wordpress.com/Book Review
September 13Confessions of a Book Addicthttp://www.confessionsofabookaddict.com/Book Review
September 14icefairy’s Treasure Chesthttp://icefairystreasurechest.blogspot.com/Book Review


A QUICK OVERVIEW OF ONLINE TEACHING

Teaching in the Years of the Corona Virus

Written by Kostas Pan

This book is a brief overview of the history and implementation of online teaching. While college students have been using it in one form or another for a while, the concept has been thrust into the limelight as education on all levels has been shut down during the pandemic.

For traditional teachers, especially those in elementary and middle-grade classrooms, using the computer as a teaching tool has been a supplement up to this point. Now teachers are suddenly faced with the task of taking all their lesson plans and finding a way to deliver them virtually. Notwithstanding the problems of students and schools who do not have adequate bandwidth or hardware, there is the issue of appropriate software.

Pan points out some advantages of online learning. It is flexible, and today’s software programs allow for interactive student discussions, quizzes, and teacher-student direct interaction. It can be accessed at home or by mobile device. If teachers plan their lessons well ahead, they can input measures of accountability. Teachers must prepare parents in advance. They need to ask parents to participate, encourage and supervise the younger students.

There will be a period of transition when the method seems difficult, but with time and practice students and teachers become responsible and practiced with the techniques. There is no doubt in person instruction is a crucial and necessary component of education, but online teaching has emerged due to necessity and will not disappear from the educational landscape.

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#HOW TO TEACH LEADERSHIP SKILLS IN CHILDREN # 7 – A Short List

So you have attempted to provide a nurturing environment, set up good examples, and encouraged leadership qualities in your children.

Whether you are a teacher, parent, or other type of caregiver, you have probably heard about the importance of instilling leadership. But how? What skills? Following is a basic list of leadership skills you can teach kids. They are not numbered because each is equally important.

INDEPENDENT THINKING

Help your child break out of a “cookie cutter” mindset by teaching him/her to think independently. Ask for your child’s opinions on many different subjects, without judging or stating your opinion. Be open-minded. Listen so that no opinion is “wrong” or valueless. You might then share your own opinion respectfully, and if it differs, that’s okay – part of independent thinking is hearing many sides of an issue and coming to your own conclusions.

RESPONSIBILITY

Age-appropriate responsibilities are important stepping stones on the ladder of skills necessary for building leadership. Give your child responsibilities as preschoolers, and have him deal with the consequences if those responsibilities are not met. Of course, your child will require guidance; but once your explain what the consequences will be, it’s best to let them play out.

FAIRNESS

Leaders need to be fair and just. Being too rigid and unbending is not the best way to teach your kids about fairness, but being too permissive encourages a child to put himself first. Help them to understand what is fair and what isn’t, and how sometimes being fair means being firm even when your child or others might get upset.

NEGOTIATION

Have you thought about the importance of negotiation skills in leadership? Leaders understand the necessity for give and take and that often means compromise, Think about it: government leaders, particularly the president, need to be well-versed in the art of negotiation. It’s okay to discuss your child’s wants and desires. – Allow your children to present a convincing argument as to why they think they should have whatever it is, or participate in an activity. Be prepared to allow yourself to be “talked into” something now and then!

ORGANIZATION

Being organized is essential to good leadership. Teach your children how to prioritize tasks and organize their time. Explain how to use calendars to keep things straight, and show how time can be organized in different ways when prioritizing tasks.

Children need to be taught how to organize priorities in terms of immediate and future goals. In the category of organization is also the concept of making lists. Have your children make lists of what tasks they plan to complete each day and then in one week. This also helps break tasks down into steps – maybe your child has a book report or research paper due one or two weeks from now. Helping your child break that down into weekly and daily steps can be useful- not only in accomplishing the completing of the task, but also in instilling the leadership skill of organization.

COMMUNICATION

This is a vital skill for leadership. Leaders must express their goals and their vision for whatever project or task they are leading or coordinating. They can’t expect others to read their minds or carry out instructions without direction. Teach your kids good communication and listening skills by encouraging them to share their thoughts even if you disagree, and by actively listening yourself. Both you and your child will be happier and more successful.

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#How To Foster Leadership Skills in Children – 6 #Personality Traits That Indicate Leadership Skills

Personality Characteristics of Effective Leaders

Whether you think that leaders are born or made, some characteristics that distinguish leaders from others stand out.

Have you wondered if you or someone you know is a natural leader? Are you interested in learning why they become leaders? Here are some personality characteristics that seem to go with effective leaders.

Task-Oriented

Are you the kind of person who likes to get things done? Do people come to you and ask you to do something for them and know you’ll do it? Not everyone is task-oriented, but those who are may end up being effective leaders. Being task-oriented means being a “doer,” the kind of person who focuses on getting something done and not stopping until the task is finished.

Task-oriented people generally follow through. This is important in a leader, because leaders have definite goals to reach and people to lead, and people will stop following you if you don’t get things finished.

Also, task-oriented leaders do not need “babysitting” to get something done. They can take initiative on their own – the task itself is motivation.

Honest Self-Image

Leaders tend to be pretty honest about their weaknesses and strengths, but not to the point of letting either one take over. For instance, a leader can balance between recognizing his weakness and not letting that stop him/her, and a leader can see his/her strengths without getting conceited. Those in leadership positions may find that they garner more respect when they are honest and “transparent” about their flaws than if they pretend to be perfect.

People Person

A leader tends to be a people person – someone who derives lots of energy from being around people. Such extroverted personalities make great leaders, but introverts are not barred from leadership, either. You can have a love for people and be introverted; you just respond differently to interacting with others.

In other words, you can be a “people person” even if you find yourself tired of leading at the end of a day. Extroverts and introverts can both be motivated by a love for people and their wellbeing.

“Infectious” Joy

Have you ever been around someone who just seems happy with life in general? If a person shares an idea or thought and seems really happy about it, do you feel like joining him or her? Leaders tend to exhibit this kind of infectious joy that draws other people to them. Positive-thinking leaders have a zest for life that compels other people to join them.

The general consensus is, characteristics of a good leader can be in-born or learned, or a bit of both. If you don’t have all of these traits naturally, you can learn many of them. No two leaders are the same.

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#HOW TO FOSTER LEADERSHIP SKILLS IN CHILDREN #5 – SIGNS YOUR CHILD MAY BE A STRONG LEADER

Is your child a strong leader? Do you suspect that he or she might grow up to be an effective and proactive leader? Maybe you aren’t sure what to look for. Does it matter if you discover leadership abilities early? Actually, some sources say it does matter. Observing leadership qualities early means parents, teachers and caregivers can work to develop those talents so they do not fall by the wayside.

If you want to make sure you develop your child’s leadership qualities, here are some signs to watch for. Some of them may surprise you!

Talkative

Does it sometimes drive you crazy that your child talks so much? Actually, being talkative may be a sign of things to come. A chatty nature indicates a child with excellent verbal skills, which are necessary for good leaders. Did your child talk early and proficiently? This may be a sign that he or she will be a good leader.

Treats Others with Respect

If you notice that your child seems to end up in responsible positions – team captain or band director – and you know he didn’t get that position because of “muscling” his way to the top or bullying others, then this may be a sign of leadership ability. Notice if others seem to “gravitate” toward her and wish to emulate her. Observe whether or not this is due to respectful treatment. If it is, you may have a strong leader on your hands.

Sees Both Sides

Some kids display an ability to understand both sides of an issue. They tend to be peace keepers, helping two arguing kids or adults to see reason, for example.

In the Know

Does your child always know what’s going on? Is he or she always aware of the latest events at school or in the family? This is not the same as being a gossip (that’s not a good leadership quality), but it does mean that he or she is paying attention and interested in what’s going on with others.

Inquisitive

A good leader is not afraid to ask questions, but he/she is not afraid to go looking for answers on his own. Too much questioning may indicate self-doubt – your child is always trying to make sure about things. On the other hand, healthy questions that spring from a real desire to know more about something may be a sign of leadership ability.

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How to Raise Children to Be Good Leaders – #4 in Leadership Skills Series

So you have tried to create a home environment conducive to instilling leadership skills for all your children, whether they be preschoolers or teens. It’s been said that leadership starts at home and directly linked to early training. Experts disagree about how much leadership is inborn and how much is learned. I believe that it’s a combination of learning plus a child’s innate abilities.

If you’d like to do what you can to raise your children to be good leaders, here are some tips that may help.

Teach Them to Think

Some argue that the school system, whether it be public or private, teaches kids what to think rather than how to think. Common core curriculum has placed uniform requirements and testing standards on schools across the United States. There are likely exceptions to this – special schools and special teachers – but it’s entirely possible that your kids are not being taught how to think. So whether you homeschool or enroll your children in a traditional school setting, you might try some of these exercises to encourage independent thinking.

  • Give them an age-appropriate reading task that expresses a particular point of view. An opinion piece in the newspaper is a good place to start. Ask what your child thinks about it, and have him or her write an age-appropriate response. Do the same thing with an article that expresses a contrary or different opinion.
  • Encourage them to read about topics and books that covers a range of opinions and views.
  • Ask them if they agree or disagree, and why.
  • Any time your child reads something, ask him (or her) what he thinks about it. Find out what information he drew from the reading rather than finding out if he picked up what she was “supposed to” from the reading. Let them know it’s okay to disagree with parents and teachers. Encourage them to discuss the reasons behind their disagreement.

Leaders tend to be independent thinkers, so these exercises may go a long way toward teaching your child to be a good leader.

Teach Organization

This may be something of a challenge for parents who aren’t that organized themselves! On the other hand, for those parents who are very organized, you might find that you tend to organize everything for your kids without teaching them to do it themselves. Parents need to discover a comfortable balance between the two.

Give them a calendar and show them how to keep track of their own activities. Chore lists are an excellent way to help them organize their time. Age-appropriate chores and activities, written down or drawn on a calendar, can help kids “see” their time and how they are using it, even if they are too young to tell time yet.

Ask for Arguments

Huh! Are you joking with me? Ask your kids to talk back to you?

The art of arguing respectfully is an important leadership quality. We’re not talking about angry arguments. Think in terms of negotiation and persuasion. Ask your child to tell you why he (she) wants a certain thing, or why he should be permitted to attend an event or participate in an activity. This helps your children learn how to analyze his thoughts and present reasons that produce an argument to justify why he should achieve this goal.

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A REELING REPUBLIC

Bodies in the Tiber: An Ancient Rome Political Thriller: The Sertorius Scrolls Book 3

Written by Vincent B. Davis II

Quintus Sertorius has just returned from five years of fighting for the Roman republic in the north. He is eager to return to Rome and pick up his life with a family that he is certain barely remembers him.

Davis has a fluid writing style. He bases his historical fiction on research, but he is adept at creating interesting and complex personal characters. It is the year 100 B.C. While Rome has been victorious, the republic has never been in greater danger. Sertorius has been writing a diary of sorts in his scrolls for the past year documenting history while also providing personal glimpses into his ambitions as well as his fears.

This is the third book in the series which begins seven years earlier when Sertorius loses his father and his rural village. In a struggle to survive and provide for his family, Sertorius leaves them and is thrust into the role of politician in a corrupt society.

The author uses his own military experience to enrich his story. An engaging and fascinating read for anyone interested in ancient history.

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AN EGYPTIAN ENIGMA

Mystery of the Egyptian Mummy: (Kid Zet Detective Book 4)

Written by Scott Peters

My first time reading a book in this series. Zet is a twelve-year-old boy living in the ancient Egyptian city of Thebes. He and his sister, Kat, run a pottery stall in the market to support their family. One night a mummy, guarded by a jackal, arrives at their home. Terrified, the siblings return to the market the next day to find that the whole town believes them to be cursed. Their business collapses. That makes them determined to solve the mystery.

What they discover is a much larger plot that will endanger the royal family and all of Egypt. As they artfully unravel clues to solve the mystery, readers learn a lot of information about ancient Egyptian history and culture.

Peters creates interesting characters and an engaging plot to keep middle-grade readers engrossed throughout the read. Educational and entertaining.

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