Posts tagged ‘mindfulness’

Mind over Matter

Hello Brain: A Book about Talking to Your Brain

Written by Clarissa Johnson

This book discusses mindfulness for children. It contains six stories about students in a classroom who experience different troubling situations. It begins with Sam, who is terribly shy and afraid to talk with anyone at school. Eve is frustrated because she views herself not smart enough to learn. Jane talks too much in class and can’t concentrate. Nick is grumpy, unhappy and cannot focus. Kate excels in school and sports, but cannot see the worth of other students. Will is a shy boy, who is often the victim of others who take advantage of him with unkind words and acts. In each situation, one of the other students approaches the child with a problem and reminds him that he can talk to his brain and take control of the situation to remedy the problem.

This book can be used by parents or teachers to guide discussions with individual children or a classroom group. It could be an effective resource for elementary and middle school students who are struggling with individual emotions and peer relationships. It is particularly recommended for students in the six to twelve age range.

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SLOW DOWN AND RELAX

Mindfulness for Children: The Natural Way to Cure ADHD, Improve Focus and Schoolwork, and Have a Happy and Healthy Child

Written by Tony Robson

Mindfulness,pic

This title is a mouthful; it seems like a magic formula. The author promises to explain the technique without a lot of extra boring information, and the book is less than thirty pages. He focuses on strategies that can be especially helpful for parents of children and teens who struggle with ADHD.

Robson begins with the definition of mindfulness which is meditation based on accepting and focusing on emotions and thoughts that are occurring in a person’s present moment in time. He lists the benefits of practicing mindfulness: better sleep and health, less stress, improved schoolwork, and keeping emotions in check. Next, he briefly explains how to determine when and where to meditate, how to influence your child and how to do the meditation. Robson suggests making it active, perhaps a superhero walk for a young child or a pretend driving lesson for teens. The parent must keep the child away from distractions, and search for what things worry the child. It is important to learn how to choose battles and when to respond. This will allow a child to better control emotional outbursts. Finally, teach children to be grateful so they remember the good things rather than the bad.

While these suggestions are helpful, parents need to understand that they must be able to meditate and stay in control if this technique is to be successful with their child. Robson refers them to another of his works for more detailed information. Anyone who is serious about learning and using this technique should know that this book is probably not sufficient for mastery of the technique. Certainly recommended to parents and teachers of ADHD children who are interested in finding non medical alternatives for their children

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