Posts tagged ‘environment’

STRIVING FOR SURVIVAL #HoneyGirl – Children’s Book Review Blog Tour

honeyblogtour
SYNOPSIS

HONEY GIRL: THE HAWAIIAN MONK SEAL

Written by Jeanne Walker Harvey

Illustrated by Shennen Bersani

Publisher’s Synopsis: Hawaiian locals and visitors always enjoy spotting endangered Hawaiian monk seals, but Honey Girl is an extra special case. She has raised seven pups, and scientists call her Super Mom. After Honey Girl is injured by a fishhook, she gets very sick. Scientists and veterinarians work to save Honey Girl until she can be released back to her beach. This true story will have readers captivated to learn more about this endangered species.

Ages 5-8 | Publisher: Arbordale Publishing | February 10, 2017 | ISBN-13: 978-1628559224

Available Here:

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jeanne Walker Harvey is the author of several award-winning books, including Astro: The Steller Sea Lion and My Hands Sing the Blues: Romare Bearden’s Childhood Journey. She’s been a language arts teacher and currently gives school tours at a local museum. Jeanne lives near the Golden Gate Bridge in California and walks by the bay every day looking for sea lions. She writes with her gray tabby cat sitting on the desk next to her.

OFFICIAL LINKS

JeanneHarvey.com: http://www.jeanneharvey.com/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/JeanneWHarvey

BOOK TRAILERhonrygirltrailer

https://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/weblog/2017/02/honey-girl-the-hawaiian-monk-seal-by-jeanne-walker-harvey-book-trailer.html

GIVEAWAY

To Celebrate The Release Of Honey Girl: The Hawaiian Monk Seal, Enter To Win A 2 Book Autographed Prize Pack From Award-Winning Author Jeanne Walker Harvey, Plus 2 Plush Animals.

One (1) grand prize winner receives:

  • A copy of Honey Girl: The Hawaiian Monk Seal, autographed by Jeanne Walker Harvey

  • A copy of Astro: The Steller Sea Lion, autographed by Jeanne Walker Harvey
  • Two (2) plush toy animals

Age Range: 5-8

Hardcover: 32 pages

Giveaway begins February 22, 2017, at 12:01 A.M. MT and ends March 22, 2017, at 11:59 P.M. MT.

Giveaway open to US addresses only.
Prizes and samples provided by Jeanne Walker Harvey.

https://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/weblog/2017/02/win-a-2-book-autographed-prize-pack-with-plush-animals-from-award-winning-author-jeanne-walker-harvey.html

 

My Review for The Children’s Book Review 2017 Blog Tour of Honey Girl: The Hawaiian Monk Seal by Jeanne Walker Harvey

honeygirlpic

Heartwarming, true tale of a monk seal named Honey Girl whose courage and tenacity inspired all those who came to know and love her. Honey Girl was often seen swimming along the northern shores of the island of Oahu. Unlike most monk seals, she did not shy away from the beaches. One day Honey Girl was spotted offshore covered in green algae. She was injured by a fishhook. Scientists and veterinarians discovered that her tongue was cut in half and that she had not eaten in several weeks. Vets at the Honolulu Zoo operated and managed to save half her tongue. At first she was fed through a tube. Scientists knew that if she could not eat live fish, her return to the wild would be impossible. After thirteen days, she managed to catch and eat a live tilapia. She was placed in a crate and taken back to Turtle Bay to be released.

A tracking device revealed that she was hunting for food. After a few weeks scientists caught her again to test her weight and strength. Not only had Honey Girl improved, but she was pregnant. Volunteers guarded “Super Mom” day and night while she nursed her pup named Meli. The following year Honey Girl gave birth again; one of her daughters becomes a mother for the first time. “Super Mom” is now a grandmother.

This beautiful picture book with charming double page spreads is pleasing to the eye of young readers. The poignant story teaches children about the environment as well as the work of scientists and veterinarians. Children in the primary grades who love nature and animals will want to read this book over and over again. Perfect for a bedtime story or family read aloud.

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BEAUTY IS IN THE EYE OF THE BEHOLDER

Becky and the Butterfly Girl

Written by Janet Young

Illustrated by Vladimir Cebu

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Charming picture book featuring a child named Becky who guides her young readers on a tour of her butterfly garden. Becky’s garden is designed as a wild flower garden with water features, a pond filled with fish, birdhouses and bee houses, but most importantly it provides a safe haven for butterflies. Monarch butterflies are quickly disappearing due to the rapid expansion of roads and cities. Becky’s tour leads us through cone flowers, monarda, asters, goldenrod and milkweed. This garden is free of pesticides and chemical fertilizers. The monarch butterflies lay their eggs on the underside of milkweed leaves; which are the only kind of food they eat, but which are poisonous to humans. Once the eggs become caterpillars, Becky’s dad carefully moves them to a cage where they continue to feed on milkweed leaves until they form a chrysalis. After about ten days they emerge as butterflies, when they are carefully released from their cage.

The illustrations depict Becky and her beautiful garden plants and animal friends. Story is based on Becky Lecroy, a genuine character whose parents raise monarch butterflies in their own wild flower backyard. Nice way to teach children about the life cycle of the monarch butterfly and the importance of conserving the species. Targeted for grades preschool through grade four, this book should be included on classroom shelves in elementary school as well as those in libraries and environmentally conscious parents who might want to undertake the project on a smaller scale. I personally plant milkweed in my tiny garden to encourage monarchs to settle there. Sadly, in recent years, I have noticed a dramatic drop in the lovely creatures that used to fill my backyard.

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NO BAD LUCK HERE

Albatrosses: Amazing Animal Facts

Written by Rita Terry

albatrosspic

Contrary to the widely known expression from The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, “an albatross around your neck,” the albatross has nothing to do with bad luck. These beautiful animals are the world’s largest seabirds. Levy enlightens readers about the twenty-two varieties, their distinctive appearance, size and weight, diet, habitat, breeding habits, courtship, enemies, and environmental threats.

Most readers probably know little about these birds. I found it interesting that they live for long periods of time on one island, mate with one partner for life, and do not leave their parents until they master the intricate courtship dance to attract their life partner. The fact that the Wandering Albatross can soar without moving its wings for days at a time is amazing. It is sad that so many of these birds are killed when they dive down deep for fish bait and then drown before they can return to the surface.

This book is targeted for readers ages five to eighteen. Photographs are beautiful; the book will probably be most interesting to readers eight and older, who will be better able to master the text. This book contains a lot of information in less than fifty pages, and is well written with the exception of a typo in the spelling of Antarctica. Young animal lovers or children looking for an interesting research project will find the book a valuable nonfiction resource.

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#KIDSREADCLASSICS ROUND AND ROUND WE GO

Busy Wheels

Written by Peter Lippman

busywheels,pic

My April choice for a vintage classic is one that I read to my son, who like many young boys was enamored with anything that had wheels. Published by Random House in 1973, this book would be considered a new kids classic. While not as well known as some of the classic fairytales or animal favorites like Charlotte’s Web, I do believe it had widespread popularity.

Lippman employed everyday scenes witnessed by children living in city or country environments. He wrote with colorful adjectives, alliterative phrases and onomatopoeia. “Early in the morning garbage trucks roll down the street. Cans clatter. Men shout.” Lipmann put into words what children saw and heard everyday. Moms pushing baby carriages, tow trucks, ambulances, fire trucks, trains, tractors, airplanes, mail trucks, ice cream trucks and school buses. Stretching their imagination to the stars, he reminds us that wheels of the moon rover have even gone to the moon and moved moon dust.

My son and I loved to study the illustrations for the hilarious hidden pictures like an alligator on top of the school bus or a dalmatian driving the fire truck. On each reread, something new remained to be discovered. There are limited copies of this book available in hard or soft cover on amazon. http://www.amazon.com/Busy-Wheels-Peter-Lippman/dp/0394827066/

Lippman produced these board books for toddlers who love wheel books:

Lippmanbooks

I can’t end this post without mentioning Richard Scary whose books also included transportation favorites:

Scary1Scary2

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STRETCH YOUR NECK

Giraffes: Fun Facts and Amazing Photos of Animals in Nature

Written by Emma Child

Giraffes,pic

Emma Child gives us another well-written selection in the animals of nature series. The author presents a comprehensive view of the life of a giraffe in the wild. She covers their appearance, eating habits, social habits, environment, breeding, and enemies. At the end of the book there is a kind of summary or fun facts page, which children can use to share quickly with friends. Here are just a few things I learned in this book: a giraffe’s neck might weigh as much as 600 pounds, giraffes have four stomachs and a purple tongue to help protect against sunburn, and giraffes sleep only from ten minutes to two hours per day!.

Four color photo illustrations accompany each chapter. Unlike most children’s e books, these pictures can be enlarged so that the reader can study them in greater detail. The author has a good sense of humor and the book is written in a casual free flowing text style. Perhaps because the giraffe is considered such a docile animal, it is often overlooked. Children who are animal lovers will enjoy learning and looking at this book over and over. Appropriate for any age, but especially recommended as an independent read for children ages seven and older.

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SUMMER ANGST

Indian Summer

Written by Tracy Richardson

IndianSummer,pic

Twelve year old Marcie Horton is feeling good about finishing the last day of school, but at the same time is dreading the upcoming summer. While she has always enjoyed spending time at her grandparents’ home on Lake Pappakeechee, this year is different. None of her friends will be going.

Marcie is a talented and competitive athlete, but not one of the “popular girls” at school. Her discomfort is increased when the parents of one of these girls inform her that they have just built a huge house on the lake, and invite her to spend time at their home with their daughter, Kaitlyn.

As the summer unfolds, things get more and more complicated. Kaitlyn pushes Marcie to make decisions with which she is not comfortable. Her loyalties are torn between peer pressure and family. When Kaitlyn’s father plans a development that will threaten the existing lake environment, Marcie is again forced to choose. To make matters worse, strange visions are haunting Marcie. She feels as if she in living both in the past and present. An unexpected turn of events allows her to be drawn by some mystical force to make a miraculous discovery.

In some ways the plot is predictable, yet the characters are compelling and so well-drawn that I read the book in one sitting. This book hits on so many issues that face tweens and teens. A bit of magic, history, fantasy, coming of age, environmental issues, family, and loyalty all combine to make one entertaining story With a page count of just over two hundred pages, it is a bit long for a middle grade read, but the book is a comfortable and easy read. Recommended for ages ten and above with lots of appeal for both boys and girls.

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SAFARI GONE WRONG

Lost in Lion Country

Written by Blair Polly and D.M. Potter

lostinlioncountry,pic

This book is an interactive adventure for children age ten and above. The setting is Serengeti National Park. A young boy traveling in a Land Rover on safari is our protagonist. He is standing beside the truck taking photos when suddenly it zooms off. No one appears to notice that he is missing. Suddenly he is alone being chased by hyenas faced with his first decision. Should he climb an acacia tree or follow a dried creek bed to get out of viewing range? At the end of each chapter, the reader is given the opportunity to determine the outcome of the story. Each section has two choices. Readers may decide to go back and change their mind or reread the story an entirely different way.

Students will enjoy being in control of the outcome of their adventure. The author provides tips on how to navigate the story on different types of devices. The size of the chapters make them perfect for teachers to use as a short classroom read aloud over a period of several days. Topics are interesting for adventure lovers, environmentalists, animal lovers and enthusiasts of African culture. Highly recommended for reluctant readers. The complexity of text is just right for middle school readers, but is not condescending. As an adult, I found it pleasurable to read as well.

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