Posts tagged ‘planning ahead’

HOW TO FOSTER LEADERSHIP SKILLS IN CHILDREN – #9 What Happens When You Need to Deal with Adults?

Keys to Being an Effective Leader of Fellow Adults

An entirely different approach is called for, but some of the principles are the same no matter what age you’re leading.

Maybe you are going to be training a group of adults for a specific job, or perhaps you have to organize a community consignment sale. Maybe you need to find volunteers for a work or church function. There numerous situations where adults need to lead adults. Here are some keys to being an effective leader of your fellow adults.

Know Where You’re Going

No one wants to follow someone who has no idea where they’re going! Having a goal or vision is essential. It’s possible that goals may evolve or change as you go forward – it’s good to be flexible, too – but when you start out, having a clear vision can inspire others to follow you. If you really believe in it and know it can be done, your enthusiasm tends to be infectious. People like to get on board with someone who knows how to fly the plane!

Listen

As noted above, it’s good to be flexible, and that’s where listening comes in. As you express your vision and goal, even if it’s just getting things done well and on time, it’s a good idea to listen to the input of others. Someone might point out something you hadn’t taken into consideration, or he/she might have a good point about your choice of venue.

Obviously, a good leader can’t please every person’s whim, but you can take people’s concerns into consideration. If everyone seems to be saying the same thing, maybe you should change your plans a bit! People tend to appreciate a leader who listens, even if it doesn’t always mean change.

Clear Steps

In addition to a clear goal, you’ll need clear steps on how to reach that goal (or multiple goals). Explaining a “contagious” vision is great, but teaching people how you plan to realize that vision is just as important. It can seem unrealistic if you cannot clearly outline your plan. Break it down into manageable steps to present to the members in your group. A critical part of this, of course, is being organized.

Confidence

If you don’t believe in what you’re doing, how can you expect others to follow you? Make sure you are confident and certain of your plan and your methods. While it’s not a good idea to be so confident that you refuse to listen to anyone or pay attention to their concerns; demonstrating confidence and a clear vision, is contagious. Be sure of yourself and the goals that you want to accomplish.

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MONSTERS AND MISHAPS

Bedtime Stories For Kids! Funny Monsters Go Camping

Written by Alice Cussler

FunnyMonsters,pic

The author’s aim is to teach children to respect animals and nature. In the second book of this series about Furry Monsters, Melton and his friends go on a camping trip. Cussler involves them in situations that teach children about planning ahead, fire safety, becoming too confident, overcoming unreasonable fears, eating the right kinds of foods, and working cooperatively.

The print edition of this book is sixty-two pages. It is marketed for ages four through eight, but it really is a chapter book more appropriate for independent reading by a beginning reader or as a classroom read aloud for discussion. I would suggest the book for readers aged six through nine. The lessons in the book are worthwhile for discussion among families planning a camping trip. Colorful drawings of these adorable fuzzy monsters encourage young readers to follow along with the text. Look forward to following these fuzzy friends in many more educational adventures.

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