Posts tagged ‘marketing’

21 Tips for Teachers Who Want to Write

#Interview #Publishing #Marketing #Teachers

Christine Calabrese, author of The Little Pencil book series, and I put our heads together to discuss how teachers who are interested in writing for children can gather ideas on how to organize, write, publish and market.

Christine Calabrese was raised on the North Shore of Long Island by a Polish father and Sicilian Italian mother. Her father, who was a great storyteller, captivated his daughters each night with delightful bedtime tales. Her mother enjoyed nurturing and helping other children along with her own. As a child, Christine enjoyed running and playing more than sitting and reading. Her father sent her to a lovely summer camp in New Hampshire where she enjoyed horseback riding, tennis, archery, drama, swimming, sailing, singing, and friendship.

The first story she wrote in elementary school was about a little raindrop. Her favorite pastime was making inanimate objects come to life as a tease to her younger sister. Goodness! 🙂

Christine loves teaching and working with little ones! She still likes to make up stories about inanimate objects, presently, however, the objects often teach useful skills.

Barbara Ann Mojica is a historian and retired educator. She writes historical articles for the Columbia Insider under the banner “Passages.” Using the whimsical Little Miss History character, Barbara hopes to inspire children to learn about historical people and places. Little Miss History’s antics make reading nonfiction a fun-filled adventure for all ages.

The series has garnered more than a dozen awards including Eric Hoffer, B.R.A.G. Medallions, Book Excellence Award, Reader’s Favorite and Independent Author Network Awards.

We hope that teachers will find the video informative and useful.

 

BECOMING AN ENTREPRENEUR TEACHER

Teach and Grow Rich: How to Share Your Knowledge for Global Impact

Written by Danny Iny

An interesting approach for those who would use the internet to find a topic which they could use to create an educational course. Iny states the only necessity is to have knowledge or skills that are valuable for others to learn. In the beginning the entrepreneur needs only to learn what the market wants, is willing to pay for, and what will be most rewarding to himself. The next step is to find a life experience valuable to others and to map out a one page pilot course. If one can convince a small group to be willing students to test it out with the teacher and reach out to social media to ask their peers, the details can later be mapped out after the author delivers his 6029 message. The students will evaluate the course in terms of the rewards they accrued and the experience they gained, while the author can assess success in terms of the course content and the amount of financial gain or lack of it. In the end the course creator may have to modify content or go back to the drawing board. Following completion of the curriculum, the author will have to market the product to a wider audience. Here is where the author comes in for the hard sell to purchase marketing products.

The end of the book consists of appendices of case histories and the opportunity to purchase marketing advice. I believe the value of this book is in providing a general framework of how to approach setting up an educational online course. The reader will get strategy and theory but not the detailed “how to.”

If you are looking for a step by step guide, this book is not for you. It is an interesting read, but in the final analysis, it will involve lots of effort on the reader’s part to fill in the gaps.

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