Posts tagged ‘family and peer relationships’

#sixthousanddoughnuts


In partnership with The Children’s Book Review and Thomas Tosi

ABOUT THE BOOK

Six Thousand Doughnuts

Written by Thomas Tosi

Illustrated by Meaghan Tosi

Ages 8-12 | 284 Pages

Publisher: Dooney Press | ISBN-13 : 978-1954782013

Publisher’s Synopsis: Why would anyone need six thousand doughnuts?

Big family…little house… Fifth-grader Abe Mitchell is fed up with sharing. All he wants is something to call his own. And he just might get it when he finds a loophole in the fine print of a doughnut shop coupon. Abe thinks it entitles him to a fresh-baked mountain of crullers, dunkers, and chocolate-frosteds. But cashing in means war with Marlene Paczki, the daughter of the doughnut shop owner and Abe’s new crush.

PURCHASE LINKS

https://amzn.to/3fdV47n

https://bookshop.org/a/2078/9781954782013

MY REVIEW OF THE BOOK

TOO MUCH OF A GOOD THING

Six Thousand Doughnuts

Written by Thomas Tosi

Illustrated by Meghan Tosi

Abe Mitchell is tired of sharing. He lives in an attic space with his two older twin brothers. His sisters must also share. When his cousin Celia temporarily moves it, he is unhappy to learn that he and his brothers will now be sharing the attic with his sisters as well!

One day Abe is sharing a doughnut with his two sisters when he notices a coupon on his father’s coffee cup. He has won a free doughnut, one that he will not have to share. Abe’s dad refuses to return to the shop, so he decides to return another day.

Now Abe is a clever fifth grader. He notices the fine print that says prize may be exchanged for 1/20 of a cent. Abe quickly calculates that would be the equivalent of six thousand doughnuts. When Abe returns to the store to collect his prize, the owner demurs informing Abe that is just legal jargon. To make matters worse, Marlene Paczki, the owner’s daughter starts a food fight that nearly destroys the shop. Add to that, the fact that Abe develops a crush on Marlene, his problems continue to mount.

Read the rest of this hilarious, coming of age middle-grade novel to find out what happens to Abe, his family, and the doughnut shop. The black and white illustrations enhance this fun read and make it a perfect choice for a reluctant reader.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Thomas Tosi is a writer/filmmaker who, together with his wife, Heidi, has produced an award-winning children’s website, educational multimedia games, and dramatic films which have aired on national television, PBS affiliate stations, and screened in numerous film festivals. He was born and raised in New Hampshire, where he and Heidi still reside. He takes pride in the fact that they now live in a solar-powered home where they grow and can organic vegetables.

For more information visit thomastosi.com.

ABOUT THE ILLUSTRATOR

Meaghan Tosi, after being born on April Fools’ Day in New Hampshire, has collected a BFA from Laguna College of Art and Design. She illustrated this book and the graphic novel Squashed alongside author Thomas Tosi. She has also self-published DWEEDY: The Imagined Adventures of My Deceased Cat. She now lives in Portland, Oregon, for the art, coffee shops, vegan food, and the constantly lingering smell of rain.

GIVEAWAY

Enter for a chance to win a hardcover Six Thousand Doughnuts prize pack!

One (1) grand prize winner receives:

  • A hardcover copy of Six Thousand Doughnuts, autographed by Thomas Tosi
  • A high-quality ceramic Six Thousand Doughnuts diner mug featuring the Sweetly Crisp doughnuts logo.

Three (3) grand winners receive:

  • A hardcover copy of Six Thousand Doughnuts, autographed by Thomas Tosi

The giveaway begins May 19, 2021, at 12:01 A.M. MT and ends June 19, 2021, at 11:59 P.M. MT.

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW TO ENTER THE GIVEAWAY

http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/3d5cb282229/?

TOUR SCHEDULE

Wednesday, May 19, 2021The Children’s Book ReviewA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Thursday, May 20, 2021Lisa’s ReadingA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Friday, May 21, 2021Life Is What It’s CalledA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Monday, May 24, 2021Shooting Stars MagA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Tuesday, May 25, 2021Crafty Moms ShareA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Wednesday, May 26, 2021icefairy’s Treasure ChestA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Friday, May 28, 2021Satisfaction for Insatiable ReadersA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Monday, May 31, 2021A Dream Within A DreamA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Tuesday, June 1, 2021Lille Punkin’A book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Wednesday, June 2, 2021J.R.s Book ReviewsA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Thursday, June 3, 2021Barbara Ann Mojica’s BlogA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Friday, June 4, 2021The Fairview ReviewA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts
Monday, June 6, 2021Glass of Wine, Glass of MilkA book review ofSix Thousand Doughnuts

POIGNANT AND POWERFUL

The Boy Who Painted the World: A Middle Grade Novel

Written by Melody J. Bremen

While the subtitle of this book indicates a middle grade novel, this book can be enjoyed by adults as well. It tells the story of Indigo, a ten-year-old boy who is abandoned by his mother. He finds a friend with Jade, an older teen, who tries to take care of him until fate intervenes. They are separated and Indigo is forced to fend for himself. Indigo has a passion for painting. It fuels his desire to survive. He is resilient and resourceful. While Indigo is wary of trusting others, he gradually learns to reach out and experience a connection to others.

Bremen does a marvelous job of painting her characters and developing them for her readers. Each page reveals a different layer. This book is addictive, once opened the reader will have difficulty putting it aside. Readers cannot wait to discover what will happen to Indigo and his newly found friends and enemies.

This is a powerful story about resilience, homelessness, and adoption. These issues are addressed within a moving novel that encourages deep thought and discussion. Highly recommended for readers aged ten and older.

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Check out my learning opportunities for the whole family at http://www.LittleMissHISTORY.com

LET YOUR IMAGINATION SOAR

Where Dragons Fly: Land of Stars Book 1

Written by Hannah Sparks

Illustrated by Katherine Newton

Eight-year-old Ethan lives with his hard-working dad. Ethan is not looking forward to summer when he will be alone six days a week. Ethan does not make friends easily; the neighborhood kids make fun of him because his last name is Broom.

Life changes when Ethan’s dad comes home with a box that he found. It contains two glass dragons. Ethan’s dad hopes they will entertain his son. Ethan does not think much of this gift until he picks one of the dragons up and is transported to a magical land called Steorra. He gets the opportunity to ride on a dragon, meet a talking penguin, and envision a sky filled with stars.

When Ethan’s neighbor, Amelia, comes to visit, she picks up the orange dragon. They are both transported to Steorra where more adventures and new characters await them. Amelia encourages Ethan to be more outgoing. The book ends with the promise of many more adventures.

I would classify this book as a beginning chapter book. It contains just over one hundred pages filled with black and white illustrations. It is also a good choice for reluctant readers or adults seeking a fun read-aloud that can be utilized as a serial bedtime story for younger children.

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Algorithms, family, and holidays, a winning combination.

Merlin Raj and the Santa Algorithm: A Holiday Yuletide Dog’s Tale

Written by D.G.Priya

Illustrated by Shelley Hampe

The author creates a unique plot that will engage middle-grade and young teens. She does a good job of explaining how algorithms work, while creating a heart-warming tale of family devotion and holiday spirit.

Peter has a service dog named Merlin who accompanies him to school. His Golden Retriever friend tries hard to serve his master but often winds up in trouble instead. Readers are treated to a Christmas tale in while the family struggles to maintain traditions like baking and cutting down the Christmas tree while mom is traveling for work.

Along the way, readers learn how algorithms work, enjoy a bit of humor, and empathize with a close family who just want to get things right.

The black and while illustrations are charming. They enhance the feeling of identification with both human and animal characters. Recommended for ages eight and older.

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Check out all my learning resources at http://www.LittleMissHISTORY.com

WE ARE ALL IN THE SAME BOAT

Kid Legends (True Tales of Childhood from the Books Kid Artists, Kid Athletes, Kid Presidents, and Kid Authors

Written by David Stabler

Illustrated by Doogie Horner

This book will inspire children to address their fears and reaffirm their aspirations. It is divided into three parts. The first part explores difficulties overcome by J.K. Rowling, Peyton Manning, and Charles Schultz before they became successful. The second part discusses the struggles of Pablo Picasso, Muhammed Ali, and Ulysses Grant during childhood and how they overcame their handicaps to achieve fame. Part Three examines the role that family life played in the early lives of Jeff Kinney, John F. Kennedy, and Gabby Douglas. Before closing, the author and illustrator reveal facts about themselves

The illustrations are rich in detail and humorous. They are fun to look at and read. This book is perfect for middle-grade readers who are dealing with the same type of issues, bullying, family and peer relationships, and self-esteem. The book also provides an opportunity for jump-starting group discussions.

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A PASSIONATE RESPONSE

Finding Freckles, Diary of My Best Friend, Horsing Around

Written by Molly Lawson

This middle-grade chapter book is narrated by Emma Williams, an eleven-year-old girl living in a rural South African village. The impetus for the diary is a writing assignment from Emma’s English teacher.

Emma writes honestly and openly. She reveals her hopes, fears, and dreams. Her fervent desire is to own a horse and become an expert jumper. Unfortunately, her single mom cannot afford to buy her a horse. Luckily, Emma’s best friend, Christine, lives on a neighboring farm. Christine is a good rider and that allows Emma to be around horses.

Emma’s story pulls the reader in because she is relatable to her readers. The characters are believable and appealing to a middle-grade audience. Not only do readers learn about horses, but they also pick up knowledge of geography and South African culture. This is book 1 of a series that promises to be the first of an interesting series. Will Emma achieve her dreams?

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LAST BUT NOT LEAST

LAST TWO FINALISTS IN EASY READER AND EARLY CHAPTER BOOKS

Easy Reader

JUST RIGHT…

Charlie & Mouse & Grumpy

Written by Laurel Synder

Illustrated by Emily Hughes

This is the second book in a series. One thing I would like to suggest is that the author gives a brief introduction to the characters for those who did not read the first book. Two brothers named Charlie and Mouse hear a knock at the door. They are delighted to find that their grandfather “Grumpy” has come to pay them a visit. Grumpy tells them that they are getting big. Charlie agrees, but his younger brother Mouse says he is just “medium.” That leads to a delightful discussion on what the word medium means. The next morning the boys launch a plan to pounce on their grandfather, but he is already awake. The boys find a way to implement their plot. When their parents go out for the evening Grumpy entertains them with pizza and movies. They set up a fort and request a song from Grumpy, but their plans go awry with Charlie coming to the rescue. When the time comes for Grumpy to leave, the boys find it difficult to say goodbye and use a blanket as a cover-up.

This story is well-written and helps children understand emotions that are difficult to put into words. At just under fifty pages, this book is a good fit for children who are ready to transition from speech bubbles and easy readers to a traditionally laid out chapter book. There is plenty of space between the lines to make it easy to follow. Soft watercolor illustrations fit well with the storyline. Teachers might want to read each chapter separately for kindergarten or first-grade readers.

EARLY CHAPTER

HOME IS WHERE THE HEART IS…

Heartwood Hotel: The Greatest Gift

Written by Kallie George

Illustrated by Stephanie Graegin

Mona, the Mouse, is an orphan who lives and works as a maid in the Heartwood Hotel. As the story opens, most of the winter animal guests are turning in to hibernate. The staff is about to celebrate with the St. Slumber party hosted by Mr. Heartwood. The employees celebrate with a feast and exchange of gifts.

Tilly, the Squirrel, is Mona’s best friend and roommate is Tilly. Their quiet, winter season is disturbed by the arrival of the haughty, Duchess Rabbit who makes unreasonable demands. Then a mysterious thief begins to steal food supplies. A food delivery truck goes missing. When the vents are clogged, Tilly and Mona slip out to investigate. They are shocked to discover a neighboring community of which they were unaware.

The personified animal communities exemplify the best and worst of human nature. Decisions need to be made that will affect the welfare of all. Readers learn the importance of weighing self-interest versus family and community. Black and white illustrations remind me a bit of Beatrix Potter. I found myself wishing there were more of them. Lots of dialogue and twists and turns keep the chapter book lively. While this book is classified as an early chapter book and can be enjoyed by early readers, I believe the length and plot depth make it more suitable for a third or fourth-grade audience. Look forward to checking out other books in the series.

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SCARED AND LONELY

Of Feathers and Friends (Clean Adventure)

Written by Darlene Hoggard Davis

This chapter book addresses many issues confronting today’s families. Tyler has been sent to live with his Grandmother until his newly separated parents can work things out. He feels trapped and unloved because he has been torn away from his life and friends in the city. Tyler decides to run away. He finds a tree-house that belongs to Cody and Jenna. These siblings have their own problems, a mean babysitter who mistreats them and parents who are seldom home. When Cody and Jenna decide to help Tyler, he distrusts them. The only friend he has is an injured sparrow. After several mishaps, Cody and Jenna move Tyler to an old shed, where Jenna, a local foster child tries to help him when he is injured. The story progresses with many twists and turns. In the end, children and adults learn how to believe and trust in one another.

This story is targeted for grades K to 6. I believe it is best suited for children in the eight to twelve age group, who will appreciate and understand all the issues in the storyline. There is a Christian focus, but the book is not preachy. This book would make an excellent read-aloud book for discussion on many social issues.

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SEVENTH HEAVEN

Yuri And The Legend of the Seventh Sea

Written by Denis Boystov

Illustrated by Lana Khrapava

This is a sort of coming of age tale of a curious and brave fish named Yuri. Little Yuri lives in a lake where he is loved by his parents and big brother. Yuri is always questioning and never takes no for an answer from his parents and teachers. When he overhears his father tell of a hidden secret map that gives directions to the Seventh Sea, which is a paradise where fish live forever in peace without enemies or danger, Yuri immediately launches a search to find it. He is tired of dodging boats filled with humans, fish hooks, and larger sea creatures desiring to eat him.

After embarking on his journey, Yuri meets up with many dangers but also makes the acquaintance of another fish named Otto who looks out for him.   Yuri and Otto eventually find themselves at the entrance to the Seventh Sea. Now they must get through without wakening the Sea Serpent who will destroy them. Will Yuri survive and if he does, will he find that the paradise truly does exist?

Yuri is an adorable character that children will love. He appears almost human with a personality much like a curious human. The dialogue among the characters is so realistic that readers will forget that Yuri is a fish. I found myself cheering for him to succeed. Children can see themselves in Yuri as he tests his limits, but also faces his fears. The illustrations are beautiful. While I did enjoy this book as an adult reader, I would especially recommend it to a middle-grade audience.

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A SWIMMING TALE

Children of Lir: (Ireland’s Best Known Stories in a Nutshell Book 1)

Written by Ann Carroll

Illustrated by Derry Dillon

First in a series of books that explores Irish folklore for children. In the first book readers are introduced to the king of Lir who is happy living in the castle with his wife and four children. They rule over their subjects until one day the queen dies. The family is disconsolate. After a time the king invites his wife’s sister to come and live in the castle to help take care of the children. He eventually marries her. Unknown to the king, Aoife is mean and unloving toward the children. She lets out her frustrations by retreating to a distant spot in the castle where she screams. One day she decides to take the children to the lake where she places a curse on them. She condemns them to spend three centuries as swans. They plead with her to leave them with human voices and the ability to sing. Feeling a bit guilty, she accedes to that wish.

The king is furious with his queen. Meanwhile the king is distraught and searches throughout the kingdom for his children. The king discovers them one day and decides to spend the rest of his life living by their side. He uses his own magic to turn his wife into a shrieking crow. The children spend their lives swimming and wandering the seas until one day they meet St. Patrick.

Charming pencil drawings enhance the story. Most children will not be familiar with the plot. This book is an easy read for middle grade students who enjoy folklore and myth.

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