Posts tagged ‘students’

HOUSE POOR? LESS CAN BE MORE

Tiny Houses: A Beginner’s Guide….

Written by Alex Freeman

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Thinking of downsizing? Freeman’s guide will provide food for thought to anyone who is contemplating jumping on the bandwagon of now popular tiny house living.

What is considered a tiny house? The author is talking about 100 to 250 square feet of living space. Students, seniors and business owners might be some types of people considering the more economic option. Freeman covers how to plan for building, the construction and blueprints, floor plans and materials that might be used for the exterior. He outlines the possibilities for operating systems and compact appliances for the interior. Freeman presents a few ideas for the most efficient use of space in kitchens and baths as well  interior decorating ideas for home owners.

Whether you are just curious or seriously considering building or making the move to a tiny house community, this book will give you the basics that you need to know. Recommended for young adult and adult readers.

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WHO’S AT FAULT?

Blame the Child – It’s Easier: Learning Difficulties Can Be Solved!

Written by Henry Blumenthal

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This book portrays a common sense approach based on the author’s lifelong experiences in education. He bases his conclusions on study and experience which dictates it is far wiser to withhold blame and take an objective and realistic approach to the difficulties manifested in the learning process.

Student victims are often stressed because of the undue pressures placed upon them by parents, teachers and other students. The author attempts to explore flaws in the educational system, parents and supporting personnel. There are many reasons why a student falls behind, excessive absence, changing schools, peer pressure, and poor foundation in basic learning concepts. The system often finds it easier to do a complete psychological testing rather than allow the teacher to discover a particular educational diagnosis of a specific weakness that can be easily remedied. Some teachers move too quickly, teach only in large groups, and do not allow for individual differences. Placed under stress by school districts, teachers feel compelled to cover everything in the curriculum rather than ensuring a firm foundation for future learning. Understanding rather than memorization should be the goal. Teachers need to acknowledge that they too have weaknesses. Rather than fall into the trap of labeling and treating with medication, they should investigate possible symptoms of learning problems.

Blumenthal provides teachers with suggestions for teaching as well as hints for parents. He explores new ways of testing, approaches to curriculum and suggestions for incorporating good nutrition in successful learning environments, as well as productive ways to assess successful teaching. Instead of blaming, parents, students, teachers, and medical personnel can share in their success.

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