Posts from the ‘Parenting’ Category

#HOW TO FOSTER LEADERSHIP SKILLS IN CHILDREN #5 – SIGNS YOUR CHILD MAY BE A STRONG LEADER

Is your child a strong leader? Do you suspect that he or she might grow up to be an effective and proactive leader? Maybe you aren’t sure what to look for. Does it matter if you discover leadership abilities early? Actually, some sources say it does matter. Observing leadership qualities early means parents, teachers and caregivers can work to develop those talents so they do not fall by the wayside.

If you want to make sure you develop your child’s leadership qualities, here are some signs to watch for. Some of them may surprise you!

Talkative

Does it sometimes drive you crazy that your child talks so much? Actually, being talkative may be a sign of things to come. A chatty nature indicates a child with excellent verbal skills, which are necessary for good leaders. Did your child talk early and proficiently? This may be a sign that he or she will be a good leader.

Treats Others with Respect

If you notice that your child seems to end up in responsible positions – team captain or band director – and you know he didn’t get that position because of “muscling” his way to the top or bullying others, then this may be a sign of leadership ability. Notice if others seem to “gravitate” toward her and wish to emulate her. Observe whether or not this is due to respectful treatment. If it is, you may have a strong leader on your hands.

Sees Both Sides

Some kids display an ability to understand both sides of an issue. They tend to be peace keepers, helping two arguing kids or adults to see reason, for example.

In the Know

Does your child always know what’s going on? Is he or she always aware of the latest events at school or in the family? This is not the same as being a gossip (that’s not a good leadership quality), but it does mean that he or she is paying attention and interested in what’s going on with others.

Inquisitive

A good leader is not afraid to ask questions, but he/she is not afraid to go looking for answers on his own. Too much questioning may indicate self-doubt – your child is always trying to make sure about things. On the other hand, healthy questions that spring from a real desire to know more about something may be a sign of leadership ability.

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How to Raise Children to Be Good Leaders – #4 in Leadership Skills Series

So you have tried to create a home environment conducive to instilling leadership skills for all your children, whether they be preschoolers or teens. It’s been said that leadership starts at home and directly linked to early training. Experts disagree about how much leadership is inborn and how much is learned. I believe that it’s a combination of learning plus a child’s innate abilities.

If you’d like to do what you can to raise your children to be good leaders, here are some tips that may help.

Teach Them to Think

Some argue that the school system, whether it be public or private, teaches kids what to think rather than how to think. Common core curriculum has placed uniform requirements and testing standards on schools across the United States. There are likely exceptions to this – special schools and special teachers – but it’s entirely possible that your kids are not being taught how to think. So whether you homeschool or enroll your children in a traditional school setting, you might try some of these exercises to encourage independent thinking.

  • Give them an age-appropriate reading task that expresses a particular point of view. An opinion piece in the newspaper is a good place to start. Ask what your child thinks about it, and have him or her write an age-appropriate response. Do the same thing with an article that expresses a contrary or different opinion.
  • Encourage them to read about topics and books that covers a range of opinions and views.
  • Ask them if they agree or disagree, and why.
  • Any time your child reads something, ask him (or her) what he thinks about it. Find out what information he drew from the reading rather than finding out if he picked up what she was “supposed to” from the reading. Let them know it’s okay to disagree with parents and teachers. Encourage them to discuss the reasons behind their disagreement.

Leaders tend to be independent thinkers, so these exercises may go a long way toward teaching your child to be a good leader.

Teach Organization

This may be something of a challenge for parents who aren’t that organized themselves! On the other hand, for those parents who are very organized, you might find that you tend to organize everything for your kids without teaching them to do it themselves. Parents need to discover a comfortable balance between the two.

Give them a calendar and show them how to keep track of their own activities. Chore lists are an excellent way to help them organize their time. Age-appropriate chores and activities, written down or drawn on a calendar, can help kids “see” their time and how they are using it, even if they are too young to tell time yet.

Ask for Arguments

Huh! Are you joking with me? Ask your kids to talk back to you?

The art of arguing respectfully is an important leadership quality. We’re not talking about angry arguments. Think in terms of negotiation and persuasion. Ask your child to tell you why he (she) wants a certain thing, or why he should be permitted to attend an event or participate in an activity. This helps your children learn how to analyze his thoughts and present reasons that produce an argument to justify why he should achieve this goal.

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#How to Foster Leadership Skills in Children – #3 Focus on Teens

How to Lead Teens

Leading teens is different than leading children and older adults. Your role is to guide them into maturity and teach them how to manage adult responsibilities. Teens can handle more responsibilities and understand what’s expected.

But many older adults are intimidated to lead teens since they have a reputation for being rebellious. What if they won’t listen? What if they ignore your advice and “walk all over you”?

Here are some tips that may help you to lead teens.

The Right Attitude

It’s important to respect a teen’s place in the leadership process. (This is important with all ages, but teens are more aware of their own independence.) Remember that you can’t be a leader without followers! The teens have to be there for the leadership to happen.

Respect

Respecting those you lead is important. Teens probably won’t respond well to just being given orders. One way you can show your respect to the youths under your care is to listen to them. Really hear them, and respond respectfully to what they say. This proves your respect for them, In addition, it also sets a respectful tone in your group. When you do this, you’re leading by example.

Insist on Respectful Behavior

Because you’re modeling it, this shouldn’t be difficult to enforce. Ask that your teens treat each other with respect, and you can set yourself up as an example.

Be “Real”

Teens have a nose for sniffing out when something or someone is faking it. The teens in your charge don’t really expect perfection. They would prefer to interact with someone whose flaws they can identify with than someone distant and unfamiliar. Make sure to guard against hypocrisy. It’s fine to be genuine and share that you used to be a smoker or drinker while telling your teens not to smoke or drink, but if you are still smoking, your words will ring hollow and fake.

The Importance of a Good Relationship

Leading teens means assuming the role of a mentor and adviser. Mentoring means setting up an environment where learning takes place. Always set aside a time for teaching and answering questions. To form an effective leadership relationship with teens, it’s critical to know when to step back and let the teen try on his or her own and when to step in. If you develop a good relationship with your teens, then you will likely know them well enough to have figured out when to get involved and when to back off.

#HOW TO FOSTER LEADERSHIP SKILLS IN CHILDREN – #2 – SET AN EXAMPLE

Parents and teachers want children to be independent thinkers. They encourage children to develop their own opinions and have the courage to stand up for them. Whether you are working with children who are yours or you’re a caretaker for someone else’s children, learning how to lead them effectively is important. You may want to lead your kids to practice a healthy lifestyle, develop better communication skills, or something else. In any case, good leadership is a way to reach your goals with the children in your care.

How do you become a good leader for kids? It can be hard to know if you’re not used to it, or if you didn’t have strong leaders when you were a child. Here are some tips.

Set an Example

You’ve probably heard “lead by example,” but that means more than just doing something and hoping your kids will notice and imitate your behavior. It also means being purposeful in setting an example, and you’ll need to stop practicing certain behaviors and pay attention to what you say.

For instance, if you want your children to be patient with others – an important leadership attribute – then take care that you’re patient with them. If you want your children to be able to make decisions like a leader, then make sure you’re not making all of their decisions for them. Don’t be a helicopter parent. Permit your children to make mistakes and learn from them. To lead by example, you need to think about more than just living out healthy, positive lifestyle choices (although that’s important, too). It’s also important to set an example of how to treat others.

Include Them

Whether you are a teacher or a parent, including the children in your care is important to instill leadership. How do you include them? First, let them help. In the classroom, this might be a simple task like collecting papers and passing out papers. Students might be allowed to write an assignment on the board for the teacher. At home, let your children be a part of your daily routines, helping you wash the car and clean the house. After all, these are life skills, and those are the building blocks for good leadership.

Delegate

Good leaders know how to delegate responsibilities and tasks. In your home or classroom, give kids many different responsibilities. You can set things up so that the children in your care have a job to complete, and they have to delegate tasks to others to finish it. A different approach could be to simply explain the task, and give a job to each child to get it done. They will see the value of delegating. Perhaps, you might may explain that many jobs cannot be completed by one person without help from others. Each child participating will still have the satisfaction of helping to get something done.

Allow Them to Help Others

Wherever you can, let your kids help each other without being bossy or bullying. In fact, being bossy is not a good leadership skill. This is important to emphasize when you are working with children in different age groups. Teach them how to help others in an appropriate way, and then set up a scenario where that help can happen. When older siblings learn how to mentor rather than supervise a younger sibling, they learn how to transfer this skill from the family to the outside world. This method works in the classroom or at home with friends and/or siblings.

To Sum Up

Children are like sponges. They soak up what they see and hear in the world around them. Adults are their first role models. Parents, teachers, and caretakers set the example for the youth who will become tomorrow’s future. We will reap what we sow.

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Follow the award-winning Little Miss HISTORY nonfiction book series for children at http://www.LittleMissHISTORY.com

#HOW TO FOSTER LEADERSHIP SKILLS IN CHILDREN

Many children feel pressure to “fit in with the crowd.” How can we encourage youngsters to think independently and take charge?

This series is dedicated to discussing how parents and teachers can develop and facilitate a sense of independence that will foster creativity, encourage self-esteem, develop empathy and create the leaders of tomorrow.

The first post discusses how to create an environment that encourages young people to assume leadership roles.

How to Create a Home Environment That Instills Leadership in Kids

As parents and caregivers, we often want to create an environment at home that will be conducive to instilling leadership. But how? Instilling leadership can take many forms, and of course your individual family dynamic comes into play. But generally speaking, here are some tips on how to create a home environment that fosters leadership in your children.

Have a Routine

You may think that having a routine is creating followers by telling them what to do and when to do it. But actually, having a routine encourages leadership, because it provides security and a model of order and predictability. A good leader is not fickle – he or she possesses self-control and is fairly predictable. So those who are followers are certain of where they’re going.

Routines also teach organization, another important leadership skill. Organizing time is crucial if your kids are going to grow up to inspire others to follow. Include your kids in the development of your schedule and calendar, and show them how time is organized and which tasks and activities are prioritized.

Clear Boundaries

Do not cross line child in sneakers standing next to a yellow line with restriction or safety warning

As leaders, your kids will need to be able to define and enforce boundaries. Having clear boundaries in your home helps make expectations clear and lets your kids know how far they can go before they cross over. They will learn how to be fair and firm when boundaries are crossed, especially if you take care to consider the situation before enacting consequences. Not all boundary violations are the same.

To be good leaders, kids need to learn when to be firm (such as when a boundary is blatantly ignored) and when to be lenient (such as when a boundary is crossed accidentally). Including your kids when you develop boundaries and consequences is another way to create a leader-building environment.

Appreciate

When your kids do a job well, let them know. Give them positive feedback so they will learn how to give it themselves when they grow up to be leaders. A good leader knows when to pat followers on the back and appreciate their efforts.

Chores

Yes, having chore lists is something that parents may dread, or they may have heard about it and just don’t think it will “fly” in their family. But chores are one of the first ways that kids learn to be a part of the family “team,” and being part of a team is an important way to learn leadership.

Chores can be delegated depending on age and ability, and you can certainly include your kids in making the chore list. To keep motivation, have rewards for chores that are done well and on time. In fact, chores can be a way to earn privileges – your chore list can have two columns, one for chores and one for the privileges each chore earns.

To Sum Up

There are all sorts of things you can do to build a home environment that fosters leadership. Don’t be afraid to be creative, and remember to include your kids and give them age-appropriate responsibilities.

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Follow the award-winning Little Miss HISTORY nonfiction book series for children at http://www.LittleMissHISTORY.com

#GrowThroughIt #BLOG TOUR #GIVEAWAY #BOOKREVIEW

This book review and giveaway is in partnership with The Children’s Book Review. Please note that 100% of the profits from book sales are donated to COVID-19 relief efforts.

ABOUT THE BOOK

GROW THROUGH IT

Written by Jay Dee

Illustrated by Jacob Chalkley, Darren Geers, Feras Khagani, Mike Shaposhnikov, Ishmam Ahmed, and Axel Schmidt

Publisher’s Synopsis: Ellen is stuck at home. There’s no school and no friends, and Mom is working all the time. It seems terrible until she learns about the choice each day offers: GET through it or GROW through it. See how starting each day with purpose and gratitude can make all the difference! Created during the CV-19 pandemic, 100% of the proceeds from sales of this book are donated to coronavirus relief efforts.

Ages 5+ | Publisher: Kraine Kreative | May 17, 2020 | ISBN-13: 978-0989810876

PURCHASE LINKS

https://amzn.to/36kAr4D

MY REVIEW OF THE BOOK

ACCENTUATE THE POSITIVE

Grow Through It

This is the first children’s book on Covid -19, which I have read. Dee writes in a graphic novel style to portray in pictures and words the emotions and frustrations of an elementary school child in dealing with the pandemic.

Ellen feels angry because she cannot go to school and play with her friends or resume the lifestyle to which she is accustomed. Her mother tells her that she has a choice. Ellen can choose to spend her time complaining, watching TV, or hiding in her inside tent. Her other choice is to grow through this crisis by finding new opportunities to learn and help others in her community. Ellen struggles with this decision. She shifts back and forth between the two extremes. How can she stay positive? She desperately wants to see her grandmother to celebrate grandma’s special day.

This book speaks to the disappointments children are experiencing. Ellen’s mother provides a good example as to how parents may assist their children cope with this crisis. I would highly recommend it for elementary school age readers.

I received a copy of this book from the publisher and voluntarily agreed to read and review it with my honest opinions.

OFFICIAL LINKS

www.krainekreative.com

www.GrowThroughItBook.com 

Facebook.com/krainekreative

GIVEAWAY

Enter for a chance to win a copy of  Grow Through It, by Jay Dee and a group of six illustrators!

One (1) grand prize winner receives:

  • A paperback copy of Grow Through It.
  • A $50 donation will be made in the winner’s name to UNICEF for COVID-19 relief efforts.

Nine (9) winners receive:

  • A paperback copy of Grow Through It.

Giveaway begins May 25, 2020, at 12:01 A.M. MT and ends June 25, 2020, at 11:59 P.M. MT.

Enter the giveaway by clicking on the link below:
http://www.rafflecopter.com/rafl/display/3d5cb282171/

BLOG TOUR SCHEDULE

May 25The Children’s Book Reviewhttps://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/Kick-Off
May 26Word Spelunkinghttp://wordspelunking.blogspot.com/Book Review
May 27Tales of A Wanna-Be SuperHero Momhttp://wannabesuperheromom.blogspot.com/Guest Post
May 28Over Coffee Conversationshttps://www.gmarciano.blogspot.comGuest Post
May 29JrsbookreviewsHttp://www.jrsbookreviews.wordpress.comBook Review
June 1The Children’s Book Reviewhttps://www.thechildrensbookreview.com/Book Review
June 2Shooting Stars Magwww.shootingstarsmag.netInterview
June 3Barbara Ann Mojica’s Bloghttps://bamauthor.meBook Review
June 4Satisfaction for Insatiable Readershttp://insatiablereaders.blogspot.comGuest Post
June 5Fairview Elementary School (Library)https://fveslibrary.blogspot.com/Book Review
June 8Heart to Hearttynea-lewis.comBook Review
June 9icefairy’s Treasure Chesthttp://icefairystreasurechest.blogspot.com/Book Review
June 10Younger Family Funhttps://YoungerFamilyFun.comBook Review
June 11A Dream Within A Dreamhttp://adreamwithindream.blogspot.comBook Review
June 11Woodpecker Bookshttps://www.woodpeckerbooks.com/Book Review
June 12Confessions of a Book Addicthttp://www.confessionsofabookaddict.com/Giveaway

BABY STEPS

I Am Not a Baby

Written by Bob Smith

Illustrated by Victoria M.

This is a short, cute picture book written from the point of view of a toddler. Preschoolers and toddlers are constantly trying to demonstrate they can do things independently. In this tale, Mike sets out to prove he can do everything adults can do. While the pictures and story clearly demonstrate that is not the case, Mike gives his readers inspiration and confidence.

Recommended as a bedtime story or read-aloud book to encourage self-esteem for two to five-year-olds.

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I WANT TO HELP #parents #homeschool #teachers #students #coronavirus

Hi Friends,

I want to assist all those who are sheltered in place by sharing the information from fellow authors, educators, and teachers.

I will be posting daily on all my social media sites but in particular on:

Facebook Page https://facebook.com/Littlemisshistory.com

Twitter Page https://twitter.com/bamauthor

Check out my Pinterest Board for lesson plans, book suggestions, printables, and activities. https://www.pinterest.com/bamauthor/

Check out my youtube channel for videos to supplement your lessons.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVUU3m8cCeBUr2wxHAQi6Lw

Beginning March 23, children’s book authors are coming together to read and share stories and activities with children at home on the Facebook page Storytime Adventures with Children at 12:00 P.M. CDT. I will be reading on March 31.

10 Ways to Stay Positive

  • Think about gratitude, not complaining
  • Think about others, not yourself
  • Think about forming new relationships, not what others give you
  • Think one day at a time, not the future
  • Think about the things you have, not what you’re missing
  • Think about new opportunities, not things you have lost
  • Think about making progress, not how hard things are
  • Think about making your life better, not the way things are right now
  • Think about giving value, not how much money you can make
  • Think about responding to changes in new ways, not the events you missed

Stay safe by following all federal and state guidelines but don’t expose children to pandemic news 24/7.

Answer children’s questions calmly and clearly according to their age

Don’t create unrealistic expectations but address disappointments

Create a schedule and stick to it

Make sure you get outside to exercise, if possible. If you live in an apartment, create indoor exercise programs

Enlist older children to work with younger siblings

Stay in touch with relatives and friends via telephone and social media.

Check on the elderly.

Relax and remain calm! We will get through this together.

BY THE LIGHT OF THE MOON…

Mommy, What Is the Moon?

Written by Crystal MM Burton

Illustrated by Michael Finch

Such a charming picture book commenting on the curiosity of a young child. A little boy looks up and the night sky and wonders about the moon. He reflects that it has different colors. It might appear white, yellow. Sometimes its size and shape change. It has marks on its surface. The boy compares it to familiar objects like cheese, bananas, lemons, and milk.

His mother answers with facts he can understand. The moon is made of rock. It may change color or form, but it is always there just like her love for him.

The author donates ten percent of book sales to the juvenile diabetes foundation. Just another incentive to buy this beautifully illustrated picture book for toddlers and preschoolers.

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#No One Left Behind

I Belong: Mini Mindful Mantras Book 1

Written by Laurie Wright

Illustrated by Ana Santos

This book promotes the concept of inclusiveness for young children by using simple analogies and concrete examples. Wright talks about a girl named Amaya. She uses parts of the body like eyes, ears, and hearts to explain how we all have some things in common even though outwardly we might appear different. She talks about sports teams, pets, superheroes and children in wheelchairs. Simple mantras that can be recited by young children reinforce the message.

Highly recommended as a discussion book with preschoolers and primary grade readers.

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