Posts tagged ‘service dogs’

“PAWSITIVITY” GREAT

Alice Eloise’s Silver Linings: The Story of a Silly Service Dog

Written by Sarah Kathryn Frey

Illustrated by Kit Nicua

This book is a beautiful picture book that effectively teaches children how service dogs assist disabled people. As the story opens, readers are introduced to Double Doodle pups awaiting adoption. Sarah Kate is a young woman with physical disabilities who is seeking a pup to train as a service dog.

Our young protagonist pup who is selected is named Alice Eloise. He is a fun-loving silly pup who must learn how to perform a very serious job. Throughout the book, readers discover how service dogs assist their owners. In addition, the biography of Sarah Kate is included.

I recommend this book highly for elementary and middle-grade students. Parents or teachers can use the tale to develop empathy and educate youngsters about people with disabilities. The illustrations are exquisite and the story opens up multiple avenues for meaningful discussions.

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Algorithms, family, and holidays, a winning combination.

Merlin Raj and the Santa Algorithm: A Holiday Yuletide Dog’s Tale

Written by D.G.Priya

Illustrated by Shelley Hampe

The author creates a unique plot that will engage middle-grade and young teens. She does a good job of explaining how algorithms work, while creating a heart-warming tale of family devotion and holiday spirit.

Peter has a service dog named Merlin who accompanies him to school. His Golden Retriever friend tries hard to serve his master but often winds up in trouble instead. Readers are treated to a Christmas tale in while the family struggles to maintain traditions like baking and cutting down the Christmas tree while mom is traveling for work.

Along the way, readers learn how algorithms work, enjoy a bit of humor, and empathize with a close family who just want to get things right.

The black and while illustrations are charming. They enhance the feeling of identification with both human and animal characters. Recommended for ages eight and older.

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