Posts tagged ‘bananas’

MEOW IS NOT A CAT

In partnership with The Children’s Book Review and Kelly Tills

ABOUT THE BOOK

Meow Is Not a Cat

Written by Kelly Tills

Illustrated by Max Saladrigas

Ages 4+ | 44 Pages

Publisher: FDI Publishing LLC | ISBN-13: 9781736700488

Publisher’s Synopsis: Meow is definitely not a cat. Cats lick their butts. Follow along as this wild child’s unique way of following instructions ends up going a little bananas.

Meow Is Not Cat is a completely goofy story, guaranteed to make kids laugh. With a cynical cat, wild monkeys, butt jokes, and a banana cannon, even pre-readers will love shouting out their favorite parts as you read aloud. Nestled among the laughs is a lesson about how embracing a person’s different way of interpreting the world can lead to surprisingly good results —and bananas, lots of bananas.

PURCHASE LINK

https://amzn.to/3LOA31x

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Kelly Tills is the creator of her own uniquely shaped family. Kindness, neurodiversity, and potty humor are her jam. She writes silly stories for kids and believes even the smallest hat-tip, in the simplest of books, can teach our kids how to approach the world. Kelly’s children’s stories are perfect to read aloud to your little humans or to have your older kids read to you (hey, let them flex those new reading skills!). Either way, you’ll enjoy the giggles.

For more information, visit:

https://www.instagram.com/kellytillsbooks/

https://www.facebook.com/kellytillsbooks

https://twitter.com/@kellytills

MY REVIEW OF THE BOOK

DIFFERENT STROKES FOR DIFFERENT FOLKS

Meow Is Not a Cat

Written by Kelly Tills

Illustrated by Max Saladrigas

Tills authors this book to celebrate neurodiverse children who think and respond to situations differently from most children.

The protagonist is a young boy called Meow by his teacher. Meow protests he is not a cat and does not act like one. The author adds a cat as a character who ad-libs as the story proceeds. This boy just cannot seem to fall in line. He goes off in the opposite direction. When the class participates in an outing to feed the monkeys, the situation gets out of control. Will Meow find a way to fit in with the group? More importantly, is it fair that he even tries to do so?

The book is full of hilarious illustrations and situations that will have primary-grade readers laughing. They will learn the value of empathy, kindness, and respecting the rights of others regardless of physical or mental differences.

GIVEAWAY

Enter for a chance to win a copy of Meow Is Not a Cat!

Five (5) winners receive:

A copy of Meow Is Not a Cat

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW TO ENTER THE GIVEAWAY

https://gleam.io/UHCH9/meow-is-not-a-cat-book-giveaway

TOUR SCHEDULE

Wednesday, April 13, 2022The Children’s Book ReviewA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Thursday, April 14, 2022Books Are Magic TooA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Friday, April 15, 2022The Fairview ReviewA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Monday, April 18, 2022Writer with WanderlustAn article by the authorKelly Tills
Tuesday, April 19, 2022A Dream Within a DreamA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Wednesday, April 20, 2022icefairy’s Treasure ChestA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Thursday, April 21, 2022Lisa’s ReadingA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Friday, April 22, 2022The Momma SpotA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Monday, April 25, 2022Satisfaction for Insatiable ReadersAn article by the authorKelly Tills
Tuesday, April 26, 2022Me Two BooksA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Wednesday, April 27, 2022Barbara Ann MojicaA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Thursday, April 28, 2022Reading Is My SuperpowerA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Friday, April 29, 2022Life Is What It’s CalledAn interview withAuthor Kelly Tills
Monday, May 2, 2022Crafty Moms ShareA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Tuesday, May 3, 2022Lille Punkin’A book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat
Wednesday, May 4, 2022Ravenz ReviewsA book review ofMeow Is Not a Cat

YUMMY NO-COOK TREATS

No Bake Recipes for Kids: Cooking with kids Series Book 6

Written by Debbie Madsen

These recipes were designed for kids under the age of ten but are appropriate for any age family member. What adult would not be enticed by easy no-cook recipes that can be whipped up in just a few minutes?

Madsen provides a wide variety of recipes that include breakfast, entrée, snack and dessert choices. I particularly like the fact that she emphasizes preparation and safety while working in the cooking. Her introduction includes a section that reminds parents of the servings that children need to include in each of the food groups. Perennial favorites include milkshakes, waffles, and quesadillas. Ingredients like milk, honey, cheese and eggs are combined with grains like oatmeal, tortillas and noodles. Lots of popular fruits like bananas, grapes, and strawberries pop up with veggies that parents would love their children to eat.

I won’t hesitate to try some of these recipes, even though I don’t have children in the kitchen. One minor criticism. There are no pictures of these mouth-watering treats.

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BY THE LIGHT OF THE MOON…

Mommy, What Is the Moon?

Written by Crystal MM Burton

Illustrated by Michael Finch

Such a charming picture book commenting on the curiosity of a young child. A little boy looks up and the night sky and wonders about the moon. He reflects that it has different colors. It might appear white, yellow. Sometimes its size and shape change. It has marks on its surface. The boy compares it to familiar objects like cheese, bananas, lemons, and milk.

His mother answers with facts he can understand. The moon is made of rock. It may change color or form, but it is always there just like her love for him.

The author donates ten percent of book sales to the juvenile diabetes foundation. Just another incentive to buy this beautifully illustrated picture book for toddlers and preschoolers.

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AN UNLIKELY PAIR

The Elephant, Cow and The Yummy Bananas (Shortest Story Book Series for Children)

Written by Sarah G.

TheElephant,CowandtheYummyBananapic

This is the story of a baby elephant and a cow who are the best of friends. One day they are walking in the forest when they come upon a banana tree laden with ripe fruit. Cow asks elephant to reach the banana by using its trunk. Elephant obliges him, but suddenly elephant remarks, “I am hungry and I will have it.” Cow is upset and reminds his friend that he saw the tree first and should have its fruit. The two friends argued for a long time. After a while, a monkey sauntered by. The two friends asked him to be a mediator dividing the bananas equally and offering him a share. Monkey thought for a time before jumping up into the tree grabbing a banana and then peeling it. He did not divide the banana, but peeled it giving cow and monkey equal pieces of peel. Then he began to eat all of the banana himself!

The elephant asked him, “Why are you justified in eating the banana and giving us only the peel?” Then the monkey pointed out that they are two friends who are on opposite sides arguing, but that he is in the middle. Isn’t it logical that he should eat the middle part, while the two parties arguing eat the parts that are on the two sides? While the two friends pondered about this, the monkey ate all the rest of the bananas and left cow and elephant with only the peels. Finally, the two friends realized their mistake. Elephant was the first to yield. They admit to each other that they were wasting time arguing, and that friends need to share with each other. By being greedy, each of them was exploited by the monkey. From that day on, cow and elephant resolve to play and help each other sharing without hesitation.

This kindle short story is a great read aloud for young children who are in the “me” stage. The animal friends are an easy way to introduce the values of sharing and friendship. My one criticism is that the book lacks illustrations which could have been very effective in reinforcing the concepts that the author is delineating in the story. Parents and classroom teachers might want to use the book to address sibling rivalry or “how to play well and get along with others.”

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