Posts tagged ‘tolerance’

The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey – virtual book tour and giveaway #thecrystalbeads

In partnership with The Children’s Book Review and Purple Butterfly Press.

ABOUT THE BOOK

The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey

Written by Pat Black-Gould

Illustrated by Katya Royz

Ages 8+ | 40 Pages

Publisher: Purple Butterfly Press | ISBN-13: 9781955119207

Publisher’s Synopsis: A Star of David necklace or a rosary?

In 1939 Poland, a young girl is asked to give up one of these and accept the other without understanding why. However, what she must part with happens to be her most prized possession—a precious gift given to her by her father before he died.

The child’s mother then teaches the girl a “game” to prepare her for what is to come. As the Nazis invade the country, the mother is forced to make a heartbreaking sacrifice.

This beautifully illustrated picture book is loosely based on a true story. Although told through the eyes of a young girl, the book is written for readers of all ages. It also contains two study guides. One is for children, parents, and teachers. The other is for adults who may gather in places of worship, book clubs, and small groups. Discussion topics include themes of compassion, empathy, and diversity.

PURCHASE LINK

Amazon

Bookshop.org

Barnes and Noble

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Pat Black-Gould, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist and an author. Her short stories have appeared in several literary journals and anthologies.

Many years ago, Pat heard a powerful story that haunted her until she committed it to paper. The Crystal Beads was first published in Jewish Fiction. net in 2020. The short story then won first-place honors in two writing competitions conducted by the National League of American Pen Women, Washington, D.C.

The first was an award by the Pen Women Florida State Association. She then received the Flannery O’Connor Short Story Award as part of the National Biennial Letters in Competition. Pat felt it important to bring the story to a younger audience. At that point, she rewrote it as a children’s book. She hopes that The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey, will do justice to the story she once heard and carry its message to younger generations.

Pat’s writing explores topics such as compassion, tolerance, and diversity. She continues to examine these themes in her upcoming novel, Limbo of the Moon, written with her co-writer, Steve Hardiman.

For more information, visit www.patblackgould.com.

https://www.facebook.com/PatBlackGould

https://www.instagram.com/patblackgould/

https://www.linkedin.com/in/patricia-black-gould-ph-d-a418082b/

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/22197226.Pat_Black_Gould%20

MY REVIEW OF THIS BOOK

THE HOLOCAUST FOR CHILDREN

The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey

Written by Patricia Black-Gould

Illustrated by Katya Royz

The story opens in 1939 Poland. A little girl named Lalka treasures the Star of David necklace that her father gave her shortly before he died. Suddenly, Lalka’s mother asks her to remove it and instead gifts her a set of crystal beads called a rosary. They will be playing a game. Lalka must learn all about its secrets.

Shortly after, Lalka’s mother enrolls her in a convent school where she will live and go to Catholic school. She is confused and upset but follows the instructions her mother had given her. When two men come to interrogate her, Lalka faces a difficult decision.

Gould writes about the holocaust story in a way with which elementary and middle-school readers understand. Readers empathize and absorb its impact through Lalka’s experiences. The book is sensitive and well-written. Royz illustrates it with compassion and tenderness.

The discussion guides for both children and adults are carefully crafted. They provide the tools to assure a fruitful learning environment. Gould also explains how children may become involved as active participants in the Children’s Holocaust Project.

I highly recommend the book to parents and teachers of children ages five through twelve.

GIVEAWAY

Enter for a chance to win a copy of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey!

Four (4) winners receive:

A signed copy of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey.

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW TO ENTER THE GIVEAWAY

https://gleam.io/PvMG9/the-crystal-beads-book-giveaway

TOUR SCHEDULE

Monday, July 11, 2022The Children’s Book ReviewA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey
Tuesday, July 12, 2022Life Is What It’s CalledAn interview with author Pat Black-Gould
Wednesday, July 13, 2022The Momma SpotA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey
Thursday, July 14, 2022Satisfaction for Insatiable ReadersA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey
Friday, July 15, 2022Writer with WanderlustA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey
Monday, July 18, 2022Me Two BooksA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey
Tuesday, July 19, 2022icefairy’s Treasure ChestA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey
Wednesday, July 20, 2022Barbara Ann MojicaA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey
Thursday, July 21, 2022The Twirling Book PrincessAn article by author Pat Black-Gould
Friday, July 22, 2022The Fairview ReviewA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey
Monday, July 25, 2022Lisa’s ReadingA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey
Tuesday, July 26, 2022Shooting Stars MagAn article by author Pat Black-Gould
Wednesday, July 27, 2022J.R.s Book ReviewsA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey
Thursday, July 28, 2022Crafty Moms ShareA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey
Friday, July 29, 2022Because I Said SoA book review of The Crystal Beads, Lalka’s Journey

TEACHABLE MOMENTS

Bleagh: A book about values

 

Written by Leana Lyn Doray

Illustrated by Little Pink Pebble

Bleaghpic

This book uses a unique approach to teach life lessons to children by engaging a monster creature named Bleagh (pronounced Bleh). Doray prefaces the book by giving the three definitions of bleagh: 1) the name of a friendly monster who wants to make new friends, 2) the sound children make when they smell something unpleasant, and 3) the sound that a friendly monster makes. At the beginning of the story, the reader meets Bleagh, a friendly but ugly homesick monster who has just arrived at school for the first time. Bleagh misses his other monster friends and does not understand the language or the customs of these children who appear terrified of him. Their teacher, Ms. Lyn explains that the creature is not mean but afraid so they should show EMPATHY for him. They do make an effort to do just that, but Bleagh terrifies them with the sounds he makes. She encourages the children to show TOLERANCE,  but that is very difficult to do when the creature opens stinky garbage to eat for his lunch. Some of the children get the brilliant idea to give him a pile of stinky socks to eat. The classroom practices COOPERATION when they all must assume different roles in a class project. There are team leaders, presenters, timekeepers and illustrators. When the time comes for the students to examine all their work hung on the walls, Bleagh says that one of them, “looks like a baboon’s backside.” He has the children in tears. Ms. Lyn says, “You never truly see something till you see beauty.” After a few moments, Bleagh steps back and notices new colors and patterns, exclaiming, “It’s fantastic.” They all break out in applause. Near the end of the day, Ms. Lyn reminds them that it is time to vote for the Star Student of the day. Bleagh wants to vote for himself, but decides that would be cheating. So he displays INTEGRITY and votes for Ming instead. There is a surprise ending that all readers will enjoy.

In addition to the four highlighted virtues embedded in the story, there are spellbinding illustrations of monsters, exotic plants, art work, and the classroom in which the children work. Little Pink Pebble has done an amazing job of portraying the story line and moods of the characters. The drawings display multicultural children in beautiful colors and exotic settings. Furthermore, the lessons it promotes have universal appeal and relevance. I highly recommend this book to parents and teachers of children age seven and up.

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