Posts tagged ‘special olympics’

SHARING MEANS CARING – BOOK BLITZ

Bash and Lucy Fetching Jealousy Book Two

Written by Lisa and Michael Cohn

Illustrated by Heather Nichols

BashandLucy,pic

Book Two in the Bash and Lucy Picture Book series is a charming picture book for children in the early elementary grades. In this adventure, Lucy is the mascot of Bash’s soccer team; her support has helped lead them to the team championship. Lucy delights the crowd with her antics dressed in her baseball uniform and cap. But on the day of the championship, another team led by a boy named Tristan asks that they allow Lucy to guide their team to a win in the Special Olympics. Bash and his teammates are overcome with jealousy as they watch Lucy cheering and entertaining for another team. They become so desperate that they crawl around the ground acting like puppies in order to lure Lucy back to them.

Lucy is overjoyed to help her new friends and doesn’t have a problem sharing, but Bash and the team can’t seem to understand. Who will win Lucy’s loyalty? Is there a way that both teams can win?

The illustrations in this book are beautifully done in soft pastel colors, portraying the emotions of the characters well. I think that children will experience the deep emotions on both sides. This book can help parents and teachers guide children to understand their feelings of jealousy in a simple, forthright way. Recommended especially for children ages five through eight.

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AGAINST ALL ODDS…

The Leopard Tree

Written by Tim Merriman and Lisa Brochu

TheLeopardTree,pic

Three African children meet while living at the Nyumba wa watoto orphanage in Kenya, Africa and become fast friends. Their favorite spot is a tree they call “the leopard tree.” Daudi’s mother died of Aids when he was two; recently his grandmother has died and left him orphaned and abandoned without medication. Masozi is blind and lost a leg to a land mine due to civil war in Sudan, and Ramla from Rwanda witnessed the rape and killing of her family in her village. The trauma from that event has robbed her of her speech. Daudi reads the story of the Wizard of Oz to his friends, which inspires them to seek a wizard who can make life better for them and the children of Africa. Rosa Carson is a photojournalist who often visits Africa in an effort to create awareness of the poverty and medical needs of children in orphanages throughout Africa; she is drawn to and takes a special interest in these three children.

On one visit to the orphanage, Rosa agrees to take the three children on a day trip to Nairobi airport. When Daudi finds a passport on the floor, the adventures begin. The children stow away on a jet flying to San Francisco. From that point they travel by bus to Reno, a minivan to Kansas, and a goat trailer to Missouri. They walk along railroad tracks and stow away in a freight train until they arrive in Pennsylvania. Where are they going? Daudi has learned there is a UN conference in New York. He is determined to plead his case to the Secretary General Akama. All along this journey, the children must hide from the immigration authorities while they face all sorts of personal physical danger. To make matters worse, Daudi has been without any medication and his medical condition is deteriorating.

Rosa desperately wants to find these children to keep them safe and eventually adopt them as her family. She uses all her resources and contacts in an attempt to track them down. All the odds are against them succeeding; will these three unlikely spokespeople for Africa’s impoverished orphans succeed in the quest?

This book is a powerful presentation of the issues that face so many children everyday. Characters are deftly created with powerful personalities. Heartbreaking twists and turns in the plot abound. The authors paint portraits of the best and worst of human nature. I found it difficult to put the book down. Young adult and adult readers should not miss this book.

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