Posts tagged ‘South America’

SCIENCE AT OUR FINGERTIPS

The Exploding Twins: A Volcano Adventure

Written by Y. and M. Leshem

Illustrated by Lucia Benito

This is a charming, hands-on book for curious, young scientists. Daniel and Allison are twins who are listening to their Aunt Melissa, who has just returned from a trip to South America. She is showing them pictures of her climb to the top of a volcano. Their interest immediately peeks when their parents ask if they would like to create a volcano of their own in the backyard.  The twins eagerly jump at the opportunity.

The second part of the book explains in easy to understand text and vivid illustrations how a volcano looks and what happens when it explodes. Then the authors present the materials necessary to create an exploding volcano from ordinary household materials. Each step leads to the climax of the explosion.

This book is an effective combination of endearing characters and a recipe for a science experiment that any family can share together. I have seen this experiment done in the classroom many times and it never fails to amaze budding, young scientists. Highly recommended for elementary and middle-grade students as a good choice in the STEM category to encourage a greater awareness of science all around us for both girls and boys.

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FURRY FRIENDS

Guinea Pig Books for Kids Amazing Pictures and Interesting Facts

Written by Susie Eli

guineapigspic

Guinea pigs are lovable, furry, easy to maintain pets. This nonfiction book contains lots of interesting information about the creatures as well as instructions on their care.

No one knows for sure how they got their name. These creatures belong to the mammal class, though they are actually rodents. At one time they might have been transported through New Guinea or a thriving species in Guiana in South America. Others theorize that Europeans who bought them as pets paid a coin called a guinea to make their purchase. Today the largest population in the wild lives in various parts of South America

Males are called boars; females are named sows. These animals are herbivores, preferring fruits and vegetables. Average lifespan is five years. They have poor eyesight, but a keen sense of smell. Guinea pigs communicate by squealing, and prefer living in small groups. In the wild they are common prey for larger animals. These small creatures grow up to ten inches and weight two to three pounds. If kept as pets, they require little more than a clean cage with soft bedding, separate bowls for food and water, and enough room for moderate exercise.

This book is perfect for the beginning reader who is thinking about a pet, loves animals, or is seeking to build up a library of information about animals. Adorable photos of these cuddly creatures are a bonus.

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