Posts tagged ‘habits’

FURRY FRIENDS

Guinea Pig Books for Kids Amazing Pictures and Interesting Facts

Written by Susie Eli

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Guinea pigs are lovable, furry, easy to maintain pets. This nonfiction book contains lots of interesting information about the creatures as well as instructions on their care.

No one knows for sure how they got their name. These creatures belong to the mammal class, though they are actually rodents. At one time they might have been transported through New Guinea or a thriving species in Guiana in South America. Others theorize that Europeans who bought them as pets paid a coin called a guinea to make their purchase. Today the largest population in the wild lives in various parts of South America

Males are called boars; females are named sows. These animals are herbivores, preferring fruits and vegetables. Average lifespan is five years. They have poor eyesight, but a keen sense of smell. Guinea pigs communicate by squealing, and prefer living in small groups. In the wild they are common prey for larger animals. These small creatures grow up to ten inches and weight two to three pounds. If kept as pets, they require little more than a clean cage with soft bedding, separate bowls for food and water, and enough room for moderate exercise.

This book is perfect for the beginning reader who is thinking about a pet, loves animals, or is seeking to build up a library of information about animals. Adorable photos of these cuddly creatures are a bonus.

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HORSING AROUND

Horses: Amazing Pictures & Fun Facts on Animals in Nature

Written by Kay de Silva

Horses,pic

This book is a must for a child interested in horses or for an adult who wants to know more about these beautiful animals that have played such an important part in history. It is well organized and illustrated with color photographs. The author explores the family and habits of horses, their anatomy, how horses communicate, the types of breeds, and relationship to man.

Here are a few interesting facts that I discovered. A horse lies down for only 45 minutes a day, and when it does, others in the herd keep watch. A horse’s eyes are the largest of all the land mammals. Horses have baby teeth like humans. You are able to tell a horse’s age by looking at its teeth. Older horses have yellow teeth and other pattern markings. That is where the expression that it is rude to look a gift horse in the mouth originated! I learned that a horse’s height is measured in hands (each measures four inches or ten centimeters).

One of the most interesting sections discussed temperament. Horses are classified as hot blooded, warm blooded or cold blooded. Hot blooded horses are quick to learn and have lots of energy; many are race horses. Warm blooded horses are calmer and are more suitable to be riding horses. The cold blooded horses are heavier and more muscular. They are very calm and suited to work like working on farms. Today horses are involved in sporting events like horse racing and individual equestrian events. Earlier in our history, horses were used in warfare.

The author packs a lot of information in this book of less than sixty pages. Whether the reader is a horse enthusiast or just an admirer, the book and its illustrations are pleasing and informative. It is written in simple language. Recommended for children and adults ages eight and up. If you admire these beautiful animals, I don’t think you will be disappointed in this book.

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PANDAMONIUM

Pandas – Fun Facts and Cool Pictures of These Adorable Creatures

Written by Laura Han

Pandas,pic

Who doesn’t love to look at these furry, cute creatures? The author has created an early chapter book with beautiful photographs that will appeal to children in kindergarten and the early elementary grades. Han gives a bit of the history and geography of the species, its current habitat, how it is raised, what it eats, describes its habits, and writes about what we can do to save this endangered animal.

There are only about 1600 of these animals surviving in the Sichaun province of southwestern China. Though the black and white patches on their eyes resemble those of a raccoon, they bear no genetic relationship to that species. Did you know that pandas used to be kept in cages as pets for the ancient Chinese emperors? Pandas can eat as much as forty pounds of bamboo in one day, and they spend more than half the day, up to fourteen hours, eating bamboo plants. An adult panda might weigh as much as three hundred pounds, but a newborn weighs only five ounces. Pandas generally keep to themselves, but they do like play by rolling around on the ground and tumbling.

Recently, their natural habitat has been racked by earthquakes, large-scale construction projects, and deforestation. Conservationists are trying to save them by finding them homes in zoos and protecting their native habitat. The author urges her readers to join support groups.

The photographs and maps in this book are beautiful and the text is clear, concise and simple. It is a nice addition to the nonfiction and science shelves of classrooms and libraries. That is not to imply that parents and children who enjoy looking at these beautiful animals will not want to add it to their personal library.

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