Posts tagged ‘fables’

TO EACH HIS OWN

The Tent Mouse and the RV Mouse

Written by Loretta Sponsler

Illustrated by Kathrine Gutkovskiy

A pleasant retelling of the City and Country Mouse fable. In this modern-day picture book, two cousins both love to camp but have different views on how to do so.

Thomas takes to the road with his tent, while his cousin, Harvey likes the comforts of his RV camper. Thomas convinces Harry to go camping with him in his tent. Both enjoy their daytime adventures but Harvey hates the inconveniences of sleeping in the tent. Next time, they try it with Harvey’s RV. Thomas does not think sleeping in an RV affords the real feel of a camp experience. Will they continue to disagree or can they find a way to agree to disagree?

This is a cute picture book with a lesson worth remembering. My only complaint is that the small size of the text is a bit difficult for the beginning reader that it is targeted for to read easily. Recommended for beginning and elementary school age readers, particularly camping enthusiasts.

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WASTE NOT, WANT NOT

Jacob’s Secret (A Book For Kids)

Written by Emily McLeod

Jacob'secret,pic

Book of less than thirty pages based on a fable. A small village has a secret, which Old Mathew confides to his grandson, Jacob. Mathew has been entrusted with a magic well in backyard. As long as the water taken from it is used wisely, it will multiply again and again. If bad people take water out and waste it, it will empty and the village will run out of water. Seven year old Jacob promises to keep the secret, but when the water in the village river appears to be drying up, Jacob volunteers the information that he knows the whereabouts of a magic well. Jacob is now caught between a rock and a hard place. Will the town drain the well and make their problem worse or will Jacob find a solution to his dilemma?

The ending is a surprise; it poses more questions than it answers. The illustrations in the story are colorful with very graphic facial expressions. They will assist beginning readers with the text. The size of the font also favors early independent readers. Though the book is targeted for nine to twelve year old readers, the length of the story suggests it to be more suitable for readers in the seven to ten age category.

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