Posts tagged ‘emotions’

Mind over Matter

Hello Brain: A Book about Talking to Your Brain

Written by Clarissa Johnson

This book discusses mindfulness for children. It contains six stories about students in a classroom who experience different troubling situations. It begins with Sam, who is terribly shy and afraid to talk with anyone at school. Eve is frustrated because she views herself not smart enough to learn. Jane talks too much in class and can’t concentrate. Nick is grumpy, unhappy and cannot focus. Kate excels in school and sports, but cannot see the worth of other students. Will is a shy boy, who is often the victim of others who take advantage of him with unkind words and acts. In each situation, one of the other students approaches the child with a problem and reminds him that he can talk to his brain and take control of the situation to remedy the problem.

This book can be used by parents or teachers to guide discussions with individual children or a classroom group. It could be an effective resource for elementary and middle school students who are struggling with individual emotions and peer relationships. It is particularly recommended for students in the six to twelve age range.

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GOOD NIGHT, SLEEP TIGHT

Dreams: A No-Fluff Guide to Dreams Meanings, Dreams Symbols, and Nightmares Hidden Meaning…

Written by Jada Levitt

This book provides an interesting overview and analysis of dreams and how they affect us. Levitt begins her book with an introduction that defines dreams as a way for the subconscious to communicate with the conscious mind that allows one to relive or experience their emotions. Most people will spend about six years of their life dreaming. Most dreams are forgotten within ten minutes of waking up; even those who claim they don’t remember dreaming do so regularly. There are five stages of sleep, and it is only in the fifth stage that we can dream.

Levitt describes the most common types of dreams, which range from daydreaming, falling, fires, being chased, and swimming, among many others. While an exact diagnosis for an individual cannot be made, she describes the types of symbolism within each type and what that symbolism might suggest in a person’s life situation. For example, a dreamer finding herself back in school might be facing unresolved insecurities or facing situations in life now that involve new lessons to be learned.

The author explains what happens in each of the five stages of sleep, and how to best prepare for a good night’s sleep. She talks about why remembering dreams are important and suggest some techniques that will facilitate doing so. By taking stock of our dreams relating to what is happening in our daily lives, one will be better able to cope with daily situations.

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