Posts tagged ‘tundra’

#PICTUREBOOKMONTH #CHRISTMASGIFTS

CHECK OUT THE NEWEST REVIEW OF LITTLE MISS HISTORY TRAVELS TO THE NORTH POLE BY LINDA MARIE FRANK…

Spurring the imagination of young readers is something Barbara Ann Mojica does with a combination of elements that make her Little Miss History books such a success. The book is a wonderful Christmas present because Little Miss History is visiting the North Pole this time, and of course, Santa Claus figures into the history of this magical place. Mojica captures the mystery of the North Pole, one of the most unique places on Earth. She explains the geography, ecology and wild life of this special place. The history figures prominently in the book, from the Inuits to the famous explorations of the North Pole. Besides being a factually rich fun learning experience, the book is GORGEOUS. The illustrations are vibrant, with accurate details. Each page is to be savored, visited again and again. Each page leads the reader on to the next treasure. I can’t wait to give this Little Miss History Visits the North Pole to my grandson. Linda Maria Frank, author of The Annie Tillary Mysteries. The author provided the book for review.

 

#IT’S FINALLY HERE! #Christmas Gift

Barbara Ann Mojica ANNOUNCES THE NINTH BOOK IN THE AWARD-WINNING CHILDREN’S BOOK SERIES…

Little Miss HISTORY Travels to The NORTH POLE

 


Ever feel like you’re standing on thin ice?  Here at the northernmost point on Earth, no land lies below. Are there seasons? Who lives here?   What does Santa look like and where does he live? Uncover the answers in Little Miss HISTORY Travels to The NORTH POLE, the newest release in the award-winning children’s nonfiction book series.

Barbara Ann Mojica is a historian and retired educator. She writes historical articles for the Columbia Insider under the banner “Passages.” Barbara is a licensed New York State educator with forty years’ experience in Elementary Education, Special Education, and School Administration. Using the whimsical Little Miss History character, Barbara hopes to inspire children to learn about historical people and places. Little Miss History’s antics make reading nonfiction a fun-filled adventure for all ages.

Book Series Awards include International Reader’s Favorite Awards, International Book Excellence Awards, Independent Author Network Awards, Eric Hoffer Award, Global e-book award, CLIPPA Principal’s Award, and B.R.A.G. Medallions to name a few.

For more information, resources, school visits, book signings, and book reviews of family-friendly books, visit me at:

Website:           http://www.littlemisshistory.com

AMAZON:        http://www.amazon.com/Barbara-Ann-Mojica

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IT’S A HOOT

Owls: A Children’s Book About Owls: Types of Owls, Owl Facts, Owl Life, and Owl Images

Written by William Widman

There are more than 200 species of owls living on every continent except Antarctica. They live in forests, deserts and the tundra. Owls are raptors or birds of prey. They might be as small as six inches or as large as three feet. Owls are territorial and tend to reuse their nest. They have huge eyes and excellent hearing. Their specially designed wings enable them to be silent in flight and their feather colors help them to camouflage themselves. Sharp and powerful talons and claws assist in capturing and holding prey. Many owls have names determined by their environment like barn owls and snowy white owls. Different types of owls emit different calling sounds; the Great Horned Owl makes the familiar, “Hoo, Hoo sound, while the Barred Owl vocalizes a call similar to a monkey.

The author includes photographs of each type of owl, as well as nesting pictures and owls in flight. They are colorful and detailed. He suggests that you carry binoculars and a journal pad while owl watching in the woods. I really enjoyed the links provided within the book that allow the reader to hear and experience the sounds that various owls emit.

Recommend this book for children ages six and older who enjoy reading about animals. Librarians and teachers should consider adding this nonfiction kindle book to their reference collection.

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