Posts tagged ‘rainbows’

MANY HANDS MAKE LIGHT WORK

#InternationalBookGivingDay

Happy Valentine’s Day – give the gift of reading to someone you know or love!

The Rainbow Dragons and Little Sleepy

Written by Anton Sunberry

Illustrated by Konstantin Federov and Svetlana Moroz

 This is a delightful tale about a little boy called Little Sleepy because he had difficulty waking up each day. Little Sleepy enjoyed his dreams so much that he often slept through most of his daily routines. One night the boy slid down a rainbow right into his dream. There he met several dragons who were different colors of the rainbow. Each of the dragons thought himself to be the best because each possessed a unique talent. These talents included things like being strongest, funniest, most observant, best cook, best musician, and most creative. Sleepy cannot decide who is the best and suggests that the dragons will be better served by combining their talents. Only then will the dragons be able to create the rainbow bridge. If they agree to work together, Sleepy will succeed in returning home to his parents with a valuable lesson.

Illustrations are done with heart and in brilliant colors. Preschoolers and primary grade children will enjoy this tale. Sleepy-heads might even be encouraged to wake up and see their world.

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A WALK THROUGH TIME

A Rainbow of Thanks

Written by Kathleen J. Shields

ARainbowofThankspic

Kate Silverton is an eleven year old about to celebrate her birthday. Her teacher Mrs. Guffey, who she likes to call Mrs. Tuffey, has given them a weekend homework assignment to write about another culture. After being disappointed by her relative’s birthday gifts, Kate heads out to the backyard with her backpack. Suddenly, it begins to rain and she takes refuge. When the rain stops, Kate is surprised to find a rainbow which she walks through. On the other side, she meets a Navajo boy named Little Elk who is sitting on a rock in Arizona during “the week of silence.” He asks her where she came from explaining that Navajos believe the God travels on a rainbow and that a rainbow is a bridge between the human world and the other side. Rainbows also carry heroes between earth and heaven. Kate is mystified; she informs the boy that she is simply an American from Ohio who walked through a rainbow to the other side. How did she get to Arizona? Realizing that she must walk back through the rainbow to the other side before it disappears, Kate pulls out the walkman  radio from her backpack and gives it as a gift to Little Elk to ease his time of silence.

Things get even stranger when Kate emerges from the rainbow in the jungle listening to the sound of elephants and seeing a little girl named Chicktow who is searching the ground for grubs to eat. Kate is now in Victoria Falls. She presents her new friend with some oatmeal cookies stamped with Kate’s name and address labels. Kate descends with her friend to the bottom of the Falls where they locate the remnants of the rainbow. Chicktow  tells her that the rainbow arch frames the Queen of Heaven. Kate quickly steps into the arch.

Kate is disappointed to find herself in Dublin, Ireland when she emerges. The Flanagan boys greet her. In Ireland the rainbow is considered the hem of God’s garments. They tell her that leprechauns believe there is a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, but all Kate wants is to return to Ohio. She presents them with the old video player she received as a gift before she departs. Kate must still journey to Germany, Russia, Polynesia, Croatia and Scotland before she lands back in the United States. In California, she meets a medicine man of the Mojave who tells her that the rainbow is a charm the Creator uses to stop a rain storm. Finally, she walks through the rainbow one hour later to find herself at home in Ohio.

Wow! What a journey! Kate writes her report immediately before she forgets her adventure. Her mother is puzzled by her strange behavior. Mrs. Guffey gives her an A on her report, but asks why she did not choose one culture. The next week, Kate draws a stunning, accurate portrait so real that her teacher goes to her home for a talk with Mrs. Silverton because she fears that Kate is delusional.

How will Kate prove her story? A mysterious visitor will provide the answer.

This e book is available on Smashwords. A paperback version can now be found on amazon. Recommended for children ages eight and up, but adults will love it as well.

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