Posts tagged ‘homework’

How to Set Your Child Up for Lifetime Success by Helping Them Learn in School


Many people place value on educational success. Whether you feel it’s important to
attain socioeconomic status, increase earning power, or simply be more of a
well-rounded person, there are many arguments for pro-school attitudes.

From the start of a child’s beginning in school, when they are in preschool or
kindergarten, we can cultivate an attitude of success, growth, and eagerness in
them.

As they grow, their own success will depend more and more on themselves as they
make their own choices. However, there are some things you can do to make it more
likely they’ll succeed.


Routines and Daily Habits

For example:

  • Bodybuilders’ routines involve going to the gym each day.

  • A firefighter’s routine involves putting on gear and getting into the truck as quickly and safely as possible.

  • Police officers have routines when clearing a crime scene.

  • Garbage men have routines to pick up trash in the most methodical order as possible.

A routine for a child in school is no different. Explaining to your child that everyday professionals and jobs use routines is also important so they will understand the value in it.

The routine you choose for your child depends on your individual child, but basically involves setting aside a specific time of day and place for something related to their education.

What do successful school routines look like?

Consider these routines:

  • Completing homework everyday after school at the kitchen table

  • Writing down each subject’s homework in a daily journal or planner

  • Eating a healthy breakfast each morning with your student and discussing school

  • Asking your child about one or two important lessons they learned in school that day

Educational Check-In

While the singular job of a student is to go to school each day, the job of that student’s parent or caretaker is to help the student cultivate an attitude of learning. Despite the fact that we, as parents and guardians, have our own busy lives to deal with, it’s important to keep in mind that our children also are growing and learning.

There are many conversation starters revolving around school, and it is critical that parents set aside time each day to ask about school.

For example, you can ask:

  • What happened in school

  • How the school day went

  • What they learned

  • Whether anything was surprising

  • Or even what grades they got on tests

For older students, having a more in-depth conversation related to the transfer of educational knowledge to the real world is important.

Value of Report Card Grades

Some parents choose to motivate their children with rewards for good grades. While there are arguments for and against giving a child money for earning an “A” or a “B” on a report card, this can be done in a responsible way.

The basic idea is to motivate them with external rewards, but then phase it out as they grow older and the motivation comes from within themselves.

Overall, there are certainly many things you can do to jumpstart the excitement and energy that students have for school. With parenting, there are no right or wrong answers and you can even devise your own system for motivating your student for success.
 

A Math Problem

Math on the Table (The Gracie Series)

Written and illustrated by Grace La Joy Henderson

Gracie loves to do math problems. When she finds a blank math worksheet on the table in the living room, she becomes excited. Gracie inquires of her parents where it came from. Both joke that they don’t know the answer. Gracie decides that it must have been placed there for her. She hurries to solve all the problems on the paper and feels elated when she accomplishes the task.

When Gracie’s younger brother discovers the completed worksheet, he becomes distraught. It turns out this was his homework. Gracie feels ashamed. She apologizes to her brother and learns a valuable lesson. This book is part of a series in which Gracie learns life lessons through personal experiences. The series is recommended for ages three through eleven but probably most appropriate for ages seven and older.

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NIGHTMARES NO MORE

Furry Friends No More Book 1: Boris to the Rescue

Written by Kaz Campbell

Boris,pic

Bob is pretty much your average fourth grader. His father is a teacher at his school; that can be a problem. Lately, he has been having bad dreams that keep him up at night. His mother has a solution; she gives him a dream catcher and explains that his dreams will be trapped there and do longer keep him awake. Bob is astonished when a red furry monster named Boris materializes out of the dream catcher. Boris will answer Bob’s call whenever he needs help. Turns out Boris can help him with homework and bullies who pick on Bob at school. How can Bob explain Boris when no one else can see this little furry friend?

The comical adventures of Bob and Boris cover topics important to elementary school children like fitting in at school, bullying and parental relationships. Book can best be described as an early chapter book. There are a few digital illustrations randomly added to provide support for early readers. First in a series. Recommended especially for ages six through eight.

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NUISANCE NERD

Jaden Toussaint, The Greatest: The Quest for Screen Time

Written by Marti Dumas

Illustrated by Marie Muravski

JadenToussaint,pic

This is an early chapter book consisting of seven short chapters, plus black and white illustrations, perfect for early readers in elementary grades. The Prologue introduces each character with an illustration and a brief character profile.

Protagonist Jaden Toussaint is a kindergarten student who is different from the rest of his family. Mom, dad, and older sister love to read, but precocious Jaden thinks that the trouble with books is that they make you feel lonely and left out. Jaden loves interacting with people and animals; he enjoys conducting scientific experiments. One day Jaden is being persistently annoying so his father reluctantly gives him his cell phone. Jaden immediately decides using a screen is the way to his destiny.

Jaden is only in kindergarten, but he thinks Mrs. Bates, his teacher is wonderful. When the class gets homework, Jaden tries to convince his parents that computer time is mandatory, but they disagree. Jaden finds an innovative way to convince them to change their minds.

Young readers will enjoy Jaden’s clever way of manipulating adults. This book with black and white illustration and appealing characters with short chapters provides a good choice for reluctant readers and children like Jaden who normally don’t want to pick up a book. Teachers could use the short chapter format spread over a week to do classroom read aloud and discussion. Has the mark of a promising series.

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