Posts tagged ‘economics’

GETTING DOWN TO BUSINESS

The Lemonade Stand ( My Teacher Hilda Book 4)

Written by Tamar Bobokhidze

Illustrated by Salome Equizashvili

 

There are a lot of valuable life lessons packed into this book. In fact, two separate stories run side by side in Ms. Hilda’s classroom. The first story centers around the class desire to purchase a hamster for a class pet. Ms. Hilda points out that they will need money and guides the children when they come up with the idea of raising money by setting up a lemonade stand. During the process, children learn about being polite, trying new foods, taking turns, and teamwork in achieving their objective.

The second story involves their afternoon project of recreating their paintings into physical objects with playdough. When the children discover that there are more colors in the paintings than in their play dough, they must learn about primary and secondary colors and how to create and mix them.

Readers learn life lessons as they follow a day in Ms. Hilda’s classroom. I do wish the text size were larger as beginning readers might find it too small, but I would still highly recommend this series to parents and teachers of primary school age children.

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SAVE SMART, START YOUNG

A Guide to Investing for Kids: Teaching Them About Money While They Are Young

Written by Stephanie R. Baker

This book is based on the author’s theory that children who learn how to be financially independent and conscious of tracking their own expenses grow up not only to be self-aware but good global citizens. Baker gives reasons for children to learn fiscal responsibility like how to invest and be responsible for handling their own money by choosing their own purchases wisely. They learn financial independence from their parents and awareness of community needs around them. These children acquire goals and dreams of future financial success.

Children may learn how to invest by talking with their parents and picking up knowledge from schools and community programs. There are many different platforms offered for children’s investment, and Baker lists several of them with links to finding them on the internet. Alternatives to stock investment include lotteries and investing in independent funds that parents set up for them. Certainly, if many children would choose investment and financial independence the entire world community would benefit both in the short and long term.

I think this book is a worthwhile investment for parents and grandparents to consider in creating strong, resilient, independent, successful citizens of the future. Recommended for children age eight years and older to read and discuss with parents and teachers.

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