Posts tagged ‘adoption’

#EudoraSpaceKid

In partnership with The Children’s Book Review and David Horn

ABOUT THE BOOK

Eudora Space Kid

Written by David Horn

Ages 6-10 | 97 Pages

Publisher: David Horn | ISBN-13: 9781736677407

Publisher’s Synopsis: Eudora is a typical 3rd grader. A typical 3rd grader who lives on a 36 deck AstroLiner. In space. A normal girl adopted by what you might call… aliens. Her mom is a dog-like species named a Pox and runs the onboard jail (brig). Her dad is an octopus-like species from the planet Pow. She is a girl who has normal ambitions, like being the chief engineer on an AstroLiner.

Eudora is a girl who comes up with a plan to prove her worth by improving her AstroLiner’s engines and breaking all known speed records. Will she succeed and earn a promotion? Or will she end up in the brig? Again…

Brilliant for engaging emergent and early chapter book readers.

PURCHASE LINKS

https://amzn.to/3j0gaIn

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

David Horn is a huge science fiction fan. While his wife sometimes feels like they live in outer space, they really live in New Jersey with their two human daughters and one doggy daughter named Trixie. 

David loves reading science fiction books from both the old and new greats like Asimov, McDevitt, Scalzi, Howey, and more. He also loves reading his kids’ books like My Weird School, Just Grace, The Baby-Sitters Club, Ramona, and the list goes on.

David and his daughters also love watching sci-fi shows like Star Trek, Babylon 5, Stargate, and Star Wars

Eudora Space Kid started as stories he told his daughters at dinner.  They loved Eudora’s antics in space.  So now The Great Engine Room Takeover is his first book in the Eudora Space Kid early reader chapter book series.  He can’t wait for you to love Eudora’s stories too. 

For more information, visit https://www.eudoraspacekid.com/.

MY REVIEW OF THIS BOOK:

MISCHIEF AND MAYHEM

Eudora the Space Kid: The Great Engine Room Takeover

Written by David Horn

Illustrated by Talitha Shipman

This is the first book in a chapter book series sure to delight beginning readers, especially those interested in space travel.

Eudora is a third grader who has been adopted by animal creatures from another planet. She and her older sister, Molly are earth orphans. They live on a spaceship named the Athena, where they travel through the galaxies maintaining peace among the federation. Eudora loves science and experimentation. She constantly gets in trouble for “inventing” things. As the tale opens, she is on a class trip to the flight deck when she decides to fire the plasma cannons. Eudora is put in the brig, but her mother is soon willing to forgive her. On another occasion, Eudora is determined to break the record for traveling past the speed of light. Eudora is determined to become a member of the Astro Fleet command. Do you think she will succeed?

Lots of black and white illustrations enhance the large easy-to-read font for new readers. The dialogue is fun to read, and the plot moves along quickly. Quirky characters and humorous antics create a winning combination for the six to ten age group.

GIVEAWAY

Enter for a chance to win a copy of Eudora Space Kid and a $50 Barnes & Noble gift card!

One (1) grand prize winner receives: A signed copy of Eudora Space Kid and a $50 Barnes & Noble gift card.

Three (3) winners receive: A signed copy of Eudora Space Kid.

CLICK ON THE LINK BELOW TO ENTER THE GIVEAWAY:

https://gleam.io/FBh2q/eudora-space-kid-book-giveaway

TOUR SCHEDULE

Sunday, August 15, 2021The Children’s Book ReviewA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Monday, August 16, 2021The Momma SpotA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Tuesday, August 17, 2021Over Coffee ConversationA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Wednesday, August 18, 2021Life Is What It’s CalledAn interview withDavid Horn
Thursday, August 19, 2021Glass of Wine, Glass of MilkAn interview withDavid Horn
Friday, August 20, 2021Satisfaction for Insatiable ReadersA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Monday, August 23, 2021The Fairview ReviewA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Tuesday, August 24, 2021Tales of a Wanna-Be SuperHero MomA book giveaway ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Wednesday, August 25, 2021Barbara Ann Mojica’s BlogA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Thursday, August 26, 2021icefairy’s Treasure ChestA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Friday, August 27, 2021Me Two BooksA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Monday, August 30, 2021A Dream Within a DreamA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Tuesday, August 31, 2021Some the WiserA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Wednesday, September 1, 2021Heart to HeartA book giveaway ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Thursday, September 2, 2021Library Lady’s Kid LitA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room
Friday, September 3, 2021Lisa’s ReadingA book review ofEudora Space Kid: The Great Engine Room

POIGNANT AND POWERFUL

The Boy Who Painted the World: A Middle Grade Novel

Written by Melody J. Bremen

While the subtitle of this book indicates a middle grade novel, this book can be enjoyed by adults as well. It tells the story of Indigo, a ten-year-old boy who is abandoned by his mother. He finds a friend with Jade, an older teen, who tries to take care of him until fate intervenes. They are separated and Indigo is forced to fend for himself. Indigo has a passion for painting. It fuels his desire to survive. He is resilient and resourceful. While Indigo is wary of trusting others, he gradually learns to reach out and experience a connection to others.

Bremen does a marvelous job of painting her characters and developing them for her readers. Each page reveals a different layer. This book is addictive, once opened the reader will have difficulty putting it aside. Readers cannot wait to discover what will happen to Indigo and his newly found friends and enemies.

This is a powerful story about resilience, homelessness, and adoption. These issues are addressed within a moving novel that encourages deep thought and discussion. Highly recommended for readers aged ten and older.

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Check out my learning opportunities for the whole family at http://www.LittleMissHISTORY.com

FRIENDS OR FOES

The Jade Dragon

Written by Carolyn Marsden and Virginia Shin-Mui Loh

theJadeDragonpic

This is the story of two second grade Chinese girls struggling to find their identity. Ginny was born in America and is being raised by Chinese parents who follow traditional customs and live out their Chinese culture. Stephanie, on the other hand, was born in China and has been adopted by white, Anglo-Saxon parents and does everything possible to avoid anything that associates her with being Chinese.

When Ginny arrives at school for the new year, she is delighted to find that this year there is another Chinese girl in her all white school. Stephanie tries to avoid her because she does not like being “different.” Ginny tries her best to make friends and finally succeeds because Stephanie’s mother would like her daughter to be exposed to her Chinese culture. When Stephanie visits Ginny, her mother is insulted because Stephanie won’t even try to eat Chinese food. Stephanie wants to play with blonde haired dolls and American toys. She makes fun of Ginny for wearing a traditional Chinese dress, and makes Ginny feel bad that her mother refuses to allow her to wear a party dress like that of Stephanie. As the girls get to know each other better, they exchange secrets. Ginny admits that she does not always like eating Chinese food, learning Chinese calligraphy and eating traditional Chinese foods. Stephanie admits that sometimes she wishes that she were not adopted and that she lived in China so that her parents would look like her. It is so hard to deal with the stares of people who see her walking with her American parents. The two girls trade gifts. Ginny is terrified that her mother will discover she has given her jade good luck dragon to Stephanie. At one point the girls become so close that they wear matching friendship necklaces, but that friendship is threatened when Stephanie becomes jealous of Ginny’s new talents learned in Chinese school. Will these two girls who seem to have so much in common find a common bond to develop and nurture their friendship?

This story is set in the 1980’s which does make some of the variables a bit different. I do believe the conflicts and struggles do present many similar challenges in the twenty first century, even though the times present us with more diversification in schools and communities. The story still speaks to immigrant and adopted children who are coping with similar situations. Targeted reading audience is age seven through ten. The one hundred sixty page book might present an independent reading challenge for children at the lower end of that range even though it is written fairly well and the vocabulary is generally not too difficult. Dialogue seems appropriate and flows well. There is a glossary with Chinese language expressions at the end for interested readers. This book will make a great addition to elementary classroom multicultural libraries.

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